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Changes in anthocyanin and isoflavone concentrations in black seed-coated soybean at different planting locations

  • Tae Joung Ha
  • Jin Hwan Lee
  • Sang-Ouk Shin
  • Seong-Hyu Shin
  • Sang-Ik Han
  • Hyun-Tae Kim
  • Jong-Min Ko
  • Myong-Hee Lee
  • Keum-Yong Park
Research Article

Abstract

This study assessed the altitudinal variations in the anthocyanin and isoflavone contents of six black seed coated soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] cultivars. The black soybean cultivars Heugcheong, Seonheuk, Geomjeong 1, Geomjeong 2, Cheongja 2, and Cheongja 3 were planted at Milyang (12 m above mean sea level — low altitude) and Muju (600 m — high altitude), Korea on 10 June 2005 and 2006. The total anthocyanin and isoflavone contents and individual components were investigated by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). All black soybean cultivars cultivated in high altitude possessed significantly higher total anthocyanin (p < 0.01) and isoflavone (p < 0.01) contents than those grown in low altitude. For anthocyanin composition, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, cyanidin-3-O-galactoside, and peonidin-3-O-glucoside contents were significantly higher while delphinidin-3-O-glucoside contents was significantly lower at high altitude. The composition of individual isoflavones, 6″-O-malonyldaidzin, and 6″-O-malonylgenistin contents significantly increased at high altitude.

Key words

Anthocyanins black soybean Glycine max isoflavones location 

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Copyright information

© Korean Society of Crop Science and Springer Netherlands 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tae Joung Ha
    • 1
  • Jin Hwan Lee
    • 2
  • Sang-Ouk Shin
    • 1
  • Seong-Hyu Shin
    • 3
  • Sang-Ik Han
    • 1
  • Hyun-Tae Kim
    • 1
  • Jong-Min Ko
    • 1
  • Myong-Hee Lee
    • 1
  • Keum-Yong Park
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Functional Crop, National Institute of Crop ScienceRDAMiryangRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Monitoring and Analysis, NAKDONG River Basin Environmental OfficeMinistry of EnvironmentChangwonRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Planning and Coordination Division, National Institute of Crop ScienceRDASuwonRepublic of Korea

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