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Developing a culturally targeted video to enhance the use of genetic counseling in Latina women at increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

  • Alejandra Hurtado-de-MendozaEmail author
  • Kristi D. Graves
  • Sara Gómez-Trillos
  • Minna Song
  • Lyndsay Anderson
  • Claudia Campos
  • Pilar Carrera
  • Nancy Ostrove
  • Beth N. Peshkin
  • Marc D. Schwartz
  • Nan Ficca
  • Ana-Paula Cupertino
  • Nathaly Gonzalez
  • Andrea Otero
  • Elmer Huerta
  • Vanessa B. Sheppard
Original Article

Abstract

Disparities for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) persist between Latina and non-Hispanic Whites. There are few tested culturally targeted interventions. We developed a culturally targeted video to enhance GCRA uptake in at-risk Latinas. Interviews with healthcare providers (n = 20) and at-risk Latinas (n = 20) were conducted as formative research to inform the development of the video. Findings from the formative research, health behavior conceptual models, and evidence-based risk communication strategies informed the messages for the script. Then, we conducted a focus group with at-risk Latinas (n = 7) to obtain feedback for final refinement of the script. The final video was piloted for acceptability and potential dissemination in a sample of Latino community health workers (CHWs) (n = 31). Providers and at-risk Latinas suggested using simple language and visual aids to facilitate comprehension. Participants in the focus group identified areas for further clarification (e.g., cost). The result was an 18-min video that illustrates “Rosa’s” story. Rosa learns about HBOC risk factors and overcomes barriers to attend genetic counseling. CHWs reported high overall satisfaction with the video (M = 9.61, SD = .88, range 1–10). A culturally targeted video has the potential to reach underserved populations with low literacy and English proficiency.

Keywords

Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer Genetic counseling Latinas Health disparities Intervention, translational genomics, health communication 

Notes

Funding information

The project was funded by the National Cancer Institute (R03CA191543; Hurtado-de-Mendoza and Sheppard, MPIs). This project was also supported by Georgetown-Howard Universities Center for Clinical and Translational Science (GHUCCTS) by Federal Funds; the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS); and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), through the Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program (CTSA) (KL2TR001432; Hurtado-de-Mendoza. PI), by the National Cancer Institute (NCI R25 CA217723; Graves and Vadaparampil, MPIs), and by the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness in Spain (PSI2014-53321-P; Carrera, PI).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Informed consent

Was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards as laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Disclaimer

The content is solely responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Advancing Translational Science or the National Institute of Health.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alejandra Hurtado-de-Mendoza
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Kristi D. Graves
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sara Gómez-Trillos
    • 1
    • 2
  • Minna Song
    • 1
  • Lyndsay Anderson
    • 3
  • Claudia Campos
    • 4
  • Pilar Carrera
    • 5
  • Nancy Ostrove
    • 6
  • Beth N. Peshkin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marc D. Schwartz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nan Ficca
    • 7
  • Ana-Paula Cupertino
    • 8
  • Nathaly Gonzalez
    • 1
    • 9
  • Andrea Otero
    • 10
  • Elmer Huerta
    • 11
  • Vanessa B. Sheppard
    • 12
  1. 1.Department of OncologyGeorgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown UniversityWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Jess and Mildred Fisher Center for Hereditary Cancer and Clinical Cancer GenomicsWashingtonUSA
  3. 3.Department of NursingCalifornia State UniversitySacramentoUSA
  4. 4.Nueva Vida, DC Office—AlexandriaAlexandriaUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychologyUniversidad Autonoma de MadridMadridSpain
  6. 6.EXPRE, LLCGaithersburgUSA
  7. 7.National Conservatory of Dramatic ArtsWashingtonUSA
  8. 8.Cancer Prevention and Control Program, John Theurer Cancer CenterHackensack University Medical CenterHackensackUSA
  9. 9.Capital Breast Cancer CenterWashingtonUSA
  10. 10.Instituto de Medicina Oncológica y Molecular de Asturias (IMOMA)Oviedo (Asturias)Spain
  11. 11.Cancer Preventorium, Washington Cancer InstituteMedStar Washington Hospital CenterWashingtonUSA
  12. 12.Department of Health Behavior PolicyVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA

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