Journal of Community Genetics

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 33–42 | Cite as

Genetic testing and counseling for hereditary neurological diseases in Mali

  • Katherine Gloria Meilleur
  • Souleymane Coulibaly
  • Moussa Traoré
  • Guida Landouré
  • Alison La Pean
  • Modibo Sangaré
  • Fanny Mochel
  • Siona Traoré
  • Kenneth H. Fischbeck
  • Hae-Ra Han
Original Article

Abstract

As genetic advances become incorporated into health care delivery, disparities between developing and developed countries may become greater. By addressing genetic health care needs and specific differences of developing countries, these disparities may be mitigated. We sought to describe the attitudes and knowledge of subjects with hereditary neurological diseases in Mali before and after receiving genetic testing and counseling for the first time. A questionnaire of attitudes and knowledge items was adapted and piloted for use in Mali. We found that the majority of subjects had positive attitudes toward genetic testing and counseling, both before and afterwards. Subjects responded to approximately half of the knowledge questions regarding hereditary transmission correctly before and after genetic testing and counseling. Neither overall attitudes nor knowledge scores changed significantly from baseline. Concerns about confidentiality were expressed by the majority of subjects. These findings indicate that, despite limited knowledge of patterns of inheritance, Malians understood the sensitive nature of this information and were favorable toward receiving genetic testing and counseling for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.

Keywords

Genetic testing Genetic counseling Developing countries West Africa Attitudes Knowledge 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag (outside the USA) 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine Gloria Meilleur
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Souleymane Coulibaly
    • 4
  • Moussa Traoré
    • 5
  • Guida Landouré
    • 6
  • Alison La Pean
    • 1
  • Modibo Sangaré
    • 1
  • Fanny Mochel
    • 7
  • Siona Traoré
    • 5
  • Kenneth H. Fischbeck
    • 1
  • Hae-Ra Han
    • 3
  1. 1.National Institute of Neurological Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Nursing ResearchNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.School of NursingJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyPoint G HospitalBamakoMali
  5. 5.Department of NeurologyPoint G HospitalBamakoMali
  6. 6.University College LondonLondonUK
  7. 7.INSERM U679Hôpital La SalpêtrièreParisFrance

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