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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 295–297 | Cite as

Characterization of the complete plastid genome sequence of eleutherococcus brachypus (araliaceae), an endangered shrub in China

  • Ya-Juan Zhang
  • Hong Gao
  • Yuan ChenEmail author
  • Feng-Xia Guo
  • Gang Bai
  • You-Yan Guo
  • Fang Yan
  • En-Jun Wang
Technical Note

Abstract

Eleutherococcus brachypus: (Harms) Nakai (Araliaceae) is an endangered shrub that it is endemic to western China. In this study, we characterized the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome in E. brachypus. The total length of the cp genome was 156,981 bp, including a large single copy (LSC) region of 86,921 bp, a small single copy (SSC) region of 18,184 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) comprising 25,938 bp. The cp genome of E. brachypus contained 114 genes, including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and four rRNA genes. In total, 15 genes comprising tRNA-Lys (UUU), tRNA-Gly (UCC), tRNA-Leu (UAA), tRNA-Val (UAC), tRNA-Ile (GAU), tRNA-Ala (UGC), rps16, atpF, rpoC1, petB, petD, rps16, rpl2, ndhB, and ndhA contained a single intron, and three genes contained two introns, i.e., ycf3, clpP, and rps12. The GC contents of the whole cp genome, LSC region, SSC region, and IR region were 38.0, 36.2, 32.0, and 43.0% respectively, which are similar to those in other Araliaceae plants. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that E. brachypus has a close relationship with congeneric E. gracilistylus.

Keywords

Chloroplast genome Illumina sequencing Phylogenetic relationship 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the project of the fourth national Chinese medicine resources census in Min County and Tanchang County, and the Scientific Research Project of the Higher Education Institutions of Gansu Province (2017A-085).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ya-Juan Zhang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Hong Gao
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yuan Chen
    • 2
    Email author
  • Feng-Xia Guo
    • 2
  • Gang Bai
    • 2
  • You-Yan Guo
    • 1
    • 3
  • Fang Yan
    • 1
    • 3
  • En-Jun Wang
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Hexi Ecological and Oasis Agricultural Research InstituteHexi UniversityZhangyeChina
  2. 2.Gansu Provincial Key Laboratory of Good Agricultural Production for Traditional Chinese Medicines, Gansu Provincial Engineering Research Centre for Medical Plant Cultivation and Breeding, Provincial Key Laboratory of Arid land Crop Science, College of Agronomy, College of Life Sciences and TechnologyGansu Agricultural UniversityLanzhouChina
  3. 3.Key Laboratory of Hexi Corridor Resources Utilization of GansuHexi UniversityZhangyeChina

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