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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 287–290 | Cite as

Characterization of the complete plastid genome sequence of the endangered species Bretschneidera sinensis

  • Fengping Dong
  • Xinhong Liu
  • Yanqin Zhang
  • Ruisen Lu
  • Zhixin Zheng
  • Xin Shen
  • Yingang LiEmail author
Technical Note
  • 104 Downloads

Abstract

Bretschneideraceae is a specific single species family, and Bretschneidera sinensis is listed as ‘Endangered’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. As a relict plant of the Tertiary, B. sinensis is significant for the study of ancient geography and climate change. B. sinensis is endemic to China and is sporadically distributed in Thailand and Vietnam. In this study, the complete plastid genome sequence of B. sinensis was characterized from Illumina paired-end sequencing data. The whole plastome is 154,279 bp in length, consisting of a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions of 26,432 bp, one large single copy (LSC) region of 83,688 bp and one small single copy (SSC) region of 17,727 bp. The genome contains 112 genes, including 78 protein-coding genes, 4 ribosomal RNA genes and 30 transfer RNA genes. Among these 112 genes, 14 contain one intron, while only two genes harbor two introns. The overall GC content of the whole plastome is 37.4%, and the corresponding values of the IR, LSC and SSC regions are 42.7, 35.3 and 31.5%, respectively.

Keywords

Bretschneidera sinensis Plastid genome Conservation Red list 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Special Fund for Forestry Development and Resources Protection (No. 201711) of Forestry Department of Zhejiang Province, China.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fengping Dong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xinhong Liu
    • 1
  • Yanqin Zhang
    • 1
  • Ruisen Lu
    • 3
  • Zhixin Zheng
    • 4
  • Xin Shen
    • 1
  • Yingang Li
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Zhejiang Academy of ForestryHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry UniversityHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of Ministry of Education, College of Life SciencesZhejiang UniversityHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Zhejiang Jiangshan Xianxialing Provincial Natural Reserve AdministrationJiangshanPeople’s Republic of China

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