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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 725–728 | Cite as

Development of ten polymorphic microsatellite markers for Scabiosa canescens Waldst. & Kit. (Dipsacaceae)

  • Sascha A. Ismail
  • Virginia K. Duwe
  • Helga Fleischer-Notter
  • Thomas Borsch
Microsatellite Letters

Abstract

We developed ten polymorphic microsatellite markers for the herbaceous species Scabiosa canescens Waldst. & Kit. The species is currently not assessed under the IUCN Red List but has been declining historically due to intensification in agriculture and is recently declining due to habitat loss caused by agricultural abandonment of steppe-like dry grasslands. The microsatellite loci were tested for polymorphism on DNA templates extracted from 26 specimens collected across the species’ range in Germany. Across the ten loci, two to eight alleles were detected with an observed and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.192 to 0.769 and 0.265 to 0.768, respectively. These newly developed markers provide a valuable tool for population genetic investigations required to design effective conservation measures.

Keywords

Scabiosa Illumina SSR markers 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The work was financed by the Federal Agency for Nature Conservation (BfN) Germany under the grant number FKZ 3512-86-0400. Illumina sequencing was conducted at the Berlin Center for Genomics in Biodiversity Research (BeGenDiv). This is Publication No. 15 of the BeGenDiv.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sascha A. Ismail
    • 1
    • 2
  • Virginia K. Duwe
    • 1
  • Helga Fleischer-Notter
    • 1
  • Thomas Borsch
    • 1
  1. 1.Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin-Dahlem, Dahlem Centre of Plant SciencesFreie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Biological and Environmental SciencesUniversity of AberdeenAberdeenScotland, UK

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