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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 121–124 | Cite as

Isolation and characterization of 20 microsatellite markers from Carcharhinus leucas (bull shark) and cross-amplification in Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark), Carcharhinus obscurus (dusky shark) and Carcharhinus plumbeus (sandbar shark)

  • Agathe Pirog
  • Antonin Blaison
  • Sébastien Jaquemet
  • Marc Soria
  • Hélène Magalon
Microsatellite Letters

Abstract

With the development of genetics methods, it becomes possible to study the population structure and some aspects of the reproductive behaviour of endangered sharks. Here we describe the isolation of 20 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (Carcharhinidae) and their characteristics. Two to 10 alleles per locus were detected. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.00 to 0.78 and from 0.05 to 0.80, respectively. Four markers showed deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium; among them, three showed presence of null alleles. No linkage disequilibrium was detected among any of the loci. Moreover, four, 11 and 19 of these 20 markers successfully cross-amplified in the tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier, the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus and the dusky shark Carcharhinus obscurus, respectively.

Keywords

Bull shark Carcharhinus leucas Microsatellite Galeocerdo cuvier Carcharhinus plumbeus Carcharhinus obscurus 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank T. Gazzo and C. Perry as fishermen, B. Reche (veterinary), D. Guyomard (Comité Régional des Pêches Maritimes et des Elevages Marins de La Réunion) and all the participants who took part in collecting samples. This study was carried out under the scientific program CHARC (Connaissances de l’écologie et de l’habitat de deux espèces de requins côtiers à la Réunion) financially supported by the Commission of the European Communities (FEDER fund), the French Government and the Regional Council of Reunion Island. We thank Stéphanie Duthoy (Genoscreen, Lille, France) for her assistance in screening the sequences and helpful discussions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agathe Pirog
    • 1
  • Antonin Blaison
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sébastien Jaquemet
    • 1
    • 3
  • Marc Soria
    • 2
  • Hélène Magalon
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratoire ECOMAR-FRE3560 CNRSUniversité de la RéunionSt Denis Cedex 09, La RéunionFrance
  2. 2.UMR EME, IRD RéunionParc Technologique UniversitaireSte Clotilde Cedex, La RéunionFrance
  3. 3.Laboratory of Excellence CORAILMooreaFrench Polynesia

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