Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 593–598 | Cite as

Bringing genetic diversity to the forefront of conservation policy and management

  • Sean M. Hoban
  • Heidi C. Hauffe
  • Sílvia Pérez-Espona
  • Jan W. Arntzen
  • Giorgio Bertorelle
  • Josef Bryja
  • Katie Frith
  • Oscar E. Gaggiotti
  • Peter Galbusera
  • José A. Godoy
  • A. Rus Hoelzel
  • Richard A. Nichols
  • Craig R. Primmer
  • Isa-Rita Russo
  • Gernot Segelbacher
  • Hans R. Siegismund
  • Marjatta Sihvonen
  • Cristiano Vernesi
  • Carles Vilà
  • Michael W. Bruford
Application Essays

Abstract

In this essay we explore questions on how to increase the visibility and utility of genetic information for biodiversity managers and policy makers. This is discussed in the light of Aichi CBD Target 13, which for the first time impels signatories to minimise genetic erosion and safeguard genetic diversity. Drawing on qualitative results from a questionnaire sent to European conservation professionals by the ConGRESS Framework 7 Support Action (www.congressgenetics.eu), we summarise our preliminary findings on the attitudes and experiences of European conservation professionals in using genetics. We then discuss the implications of these findings for academics involved in conservation genetics and suggest that a much closer partnership between academic conservation geneticists and conservation practitioners is necessary if the full potential of genetic tools in conservation is to be realised.

Keywords

Conservation genetics Aichi target 13 ConGRESS Biodiversity management Biodiversity policy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sean M. Hoban
    • 2
  • Heidi C. Hauffe
    • 3
  • Sílvia Pérez-Espona
    • 4
  • Jan W. Arntzen
    • 5
  • Giorgio Bertorelle
    • 2
  • Josef Bryja
    • 6
  • Katie Frith
    • 7
  • Oscar E. Gaggiotti
    • 8
  • Peter Galbusera
    • 9
  • José A. Godoy
    • 10
  • A. Rus Hoelzel
    • 7
  • Richard A. Nichols
    • 4
  • Craig R. Primmer
    • 11
  • Isa-Rita Russo
    • 1
  • Gernot Segelbacher
    • 12
  • Hans R. Siegismund
    • 13
  • Marjatta Sihvonen
    • 11
  • Cristiano Vernesi
    • 3
  • Carles Vilà
    • 10
  • Michael W. Bruford
    • 1
  1. 1.School of BiosciencesCardiff UniversityCardiffWales UK
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Biologia ed EvoluzioneUniversità di FerraraFERRARAItaly
  3. 3.Department of Biodiversity and Molecular EcologyFondazione Edmund MachS. Michele all’AdigeItaly
  4. 4.School of Biological and Chemical SciencesQueen Mary University LondonLondonUK
  5. 5.Naturalis Biodiversity CentreLeidenThe Netherlands
  6. 6.Department of Population Biology, Institute of Vertebrate BiologyAcademy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicBrnoCzech Republic
  7. 7.Department of Biological & Biomedical SciencesDurham UniversityDurhamUK
  8. 8.LECA UMR CNRS 5553Universite Joseph FourierGRENOBLEFrance
  9. 9.Koninklijke Maatschappij voor Dierkunde van AntwerpenAntwerpBelgium
  10. 10.Estación Biológica de Doñana, CSICSevillaSpain
  11. 11.Department of BiologyUniversity of TurkuTurkuFINLAND
  12. 12.Department of Wildlife Ecology and ManagementUniversity FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  13. 13.Department of Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark

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