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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 301–303 | Cite as

Optimization of 14 microsatellite loci in a Mediterranean demosponge subjected to population decimation, Ircinia fasciculata

  • Ana Riesgo
  • Gema Blasco
  • Patrick M. Erwin
  • Rocío Pérez-Portela
  • Susanna López-Legentil
Technical Note

Abstract

The recovery potential of decimated populations of sponges will largely hinge on their populations’ size retrieval and their connectivity with conspecifics in unaffected locations. Here, we report on the development of microsatellite markers for estimation of the population connectivity and bottleneck and inbreeding signals in a Mediterranean sponge suffering from disease outbreaks, Ircinia fasciculata. From the 220,876 sequences obtained by genomic pyrosequencing, we isolated 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci and assessed the allelic variation of loci in 24 individuals from 2 populations in the Northwestern Mediterranean. The allele number per locus ranged from 3 to 11, observed heterozygosity from 0.68 to 0.73, and expected heterozygosity from 0.667 to 0.68. No significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci was detected. The 14 markers developed here will be valuable tools for conservation strategies across the distributional range of this species allowing the detection of populations with large genetic diversity loss and high levels of inbreeding.

Keywords

Porifera Conservation genetics Pyrosequencing Simple sequence repeats Disease outbreaks Inbreeding 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Dr. Xavier Turon (CEAB-CSIC) helped with some of the sampling. This study was funded by the Spanish Government project SOLID CTM2010-17755, and the Catalan Government Grant 2009SGR-484 for Consolidated Research Groups and Juan de la Cierva contracts to AR and RPP.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana Riesgo
    • 1
  • Gema Blasco
    • 1
  • Patrick M. Erwin
    • 2
  • Rocío Pérez-Portela
    • 3
  • Susanna López-Legentil
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Animal BiologyUniversity of BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Department of Biology and Marine Biology, Center for Marine ScienceUniversity of North Carolina WilmingtonWilmingtonUSA
  3. 3.Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC)GironaSpain

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