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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 345–348 | Cite as

Development of 15 microsatellite loci from mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus (Pisces: Sciaenidae) using next generation sequencing and an assessment of their cross amplification in other sciaenids

  • Thomas C. BarnesEmail author
  • Christopher Izzo
  • Terry Bertozzi
  • Kathleen M. Saint
  • Stephen Donnellan
  • Michael P. Hammer
  • Bronwyn M. Gillanders
Microsatellite Letters

Abstract

Next generation sequencing was used to develop 15 new polymorphic microsatellite markers for the commercially and recreationally important fish mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus). Improved knowledge of the genetic structure of the species is necessary for fisheries and environmental management. In a population of mulloway, we found that genetic variation and heterozygosity were high in most of our loci (mean number of alleles per locus = 9.46; mean heterozygosity = 0.660). To test the usefulness of our new markers for genetic research on other sciaenids, we cross amplified samples from eight other related sciaenid species, including three that form important fisheries and others that have significant conservation issues. We found that most of our new primers pairs produced scorable profiles in each of the other important sciaenids.

Keywords

Microsatellite development Next generation DNA sequencing Cross amplification Argyrosomus japonicus Kob and mulloway Sciaenidae 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Funding was provided by the Nature Foundation of South Australia Incorporated (scholarship grant to TCB and BMG-2010) and ARC Grants to BMG (DP110100716, FT100100767). We thank Mike Gardner, Alison Fitch and Leanne Payne for technical assistance, Anne-Marie Hegarty for supplying teraglin samples, Brad Pusey and Mark Kennard who collected some of the northern Australian croakers as part of research in Kakadu National Park and Susana Monsalve and Calogero Santoro for assisting with collection of lorna drum, and Ron Smernik for advice on this manuscript.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas C. Barnes
    • 1
    Email author
  • Christopher Izzo
    • 1
  • Terry Bertozzi
    • 2
  • Kathleen M. Saint
    • 2
  • Stephen Donnellan
    • 2
  • Michael P. Hammer
    • 3
  • Bronwyn M. Gillanders
    • 1
  1. 1.Southern Seas Ecology Laboratories, School of Earth and Environmental SciencesUniversity of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.South Australian MuseumAdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern TerritoryDarwinAustralia

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