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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 105–107 | Cite as

Characterization of nine microsatellite loci from the endangered southern brown bandicoot (Isoodon obesulus) using 454 pyrosequencing

  • You LiEmail author
  • Melanie L. Lancaster
  • Steven J. B. Cooper
  • Jasmin G. Packer
  • Susan M. Carthew
Technical Note

Abstract

Nine polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for a nationally endangered marsupial, the southern brown bandicoot (Isoodon obesulus) using a next generation sequencing approach. The nine markers were genotyped in 59 individuals from two distinct locations (the Mt Burr Range and the Mt Lofty Ranges) in South Australia. All loci showed Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium with the exception of one locus in the Mt Lofty population, possibly because of null alleles. No evidence of linkage disequilibrium was detected. These markers will provide valuable resources for future projects on the conservation genetics of southern brown bandicoots in Australia.

Keywords

Isoodon obesulus Endangered marsupial Microsatellites Partial 454 shotgun pyrosequencing 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project was funded by the Australian Research Council Linkage grant (LP0668987), Native Vegetation Council, Wildlife Conservation Fund, and Nature Foundation SA. We thank Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources and Forestry SA for field assistance. We also thank Kathy Saint for laboratory assistance and Alison Fitch and Mike Gardner for their assistance with 454 sequencing data analysis.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • You Li
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Melanie L. Lancaster
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Steven J. B. Cooper
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Jasmin G. Packer
    • 1
  • Susan M. Carthew
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.School of Earth and Environmental SciencesThe University of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and BiodiversityThe University of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.Healesville SanctuaryHealesvilleAustralia
  4. 4.Evolutionary Biology UnitSouth Australian MuseumAdelaideAustralia
  5. 5.Research Institute for Environment and LivelihoodsCharles Darwin UniversityDarwinAustralia

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