Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 557–563 | Cite as

A rapid PCR-based assay for identification of cryptic Myotis spp. (M. mystacinus, M. brandtii and M. alcathoe)

  • Emma S. M. Boston
  • Nicola Hanrahan
  • Sébastien J. Puechmaille
  • Manuel Ruedi
  • Daniel J. Buckley
  • Mathieu G. Lundy
  • David D. Scott
  • Paulo A. Prodöhl
  • W. I. Montgomery
  • Emma C. Teeling
Technical Note

Abstract

The development of a quick PCR-based method to distinguish European cryptic Myotis spp., Myotis mystacinus, Myotis brandtii and Myotis alcathoe is described. Primers were designed around species-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP’s) in the ND1 mitochondrial gene, and a pair of control primers was designed in the 12S mitochondrial gene. A multiplex of seven primer combinations produces clear species-specific bands using gel electrophoresis. Robustness of the method was tested on 33 M. mystacinus, 16 M. brandtii and 15 M. alcathoe samples from across the European range of these species. The method worked well on faecal samples collected from maternity roosts of M. mystacinus. The test is intended to aid collection of data on these species through a rapid and easy identification method with the ability to use DNA obtained from a range of sources including faecal matter.

Keywords

Cryptic species Chiroptera Myotis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emma S. M. Boston
    • 1
  • Nicola Hanrahan
    • 1
  • Sébastien J. Puechmaille
    • 1
  • Manuel Ruedi
    • 3
  • Daniel J. Buckley
    • 1
  • Mathieu G. Lundy
    • 2
  • David D. Scott
    • 2
  • Paulo A. Prodöhl
    • 2
  • W. I. Montgomery
    • 2
  • Emma C. Teeling
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Irish Bat ResearchUniversity College Dublin, School of Biology and Environmental ScienceBelfield, Dublin 4Ireland
  2. 2.Centre for Irish Bat Research, Queen’s University Belfast, School of Biological SciencesBelfastUK
  3. 3.Natural History MuseumGenèveSwitzerland

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