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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 331–333 | Cite as

Polymorphic microsatellite loci and interspecific cross-amplification in the New Zealand endemic gecko species Hoplodactylus duvaucelii and Hoplodactylus maculatus

  • Cheeho Wong
  • Dianne Gleeson
  • Robyn Howitt
  • Manuela Barry
  • Dianne Brunton
  • Weihong JiEmail author
Technical Note

Abstract

Eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci were obtained from Hoplodactylus duvaucelii using high-throughput genomic sequencing technology. Loci isolated from H. duvaucelii showed extensive cross-amplification for H. maculatus, resulting in six polymorphic loci for H. duvaucelii and 10 for H. maculatus. Genetic diversity was assessed in 34 individuals of H. duvaucelii from Korapuki Island, and 20 individuals of H. maculatus from Kapiti Island.

Keywords

Microsatellite Hoplodactylus Geckos New Zealand 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Funding for this project was provided by Massey University. We thank Marleen Baling for field assistance, Diana Prada, Ana Ramon-Laca and Birgit Ziesemann for laboratory assistance. The protocols in this research have been endorsed by Massey University Animal ethics committee (MUAEC 08/56) and New Zealand Department of Conservation (No-23041-FAU, WE/313/RES).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheeho Wong
    • 1
  • Dianne Gleeson
    • 2
  • Robyn Howitt
    • 2
  • Manuela Barry
    • 1
  • Dianne Brunton
    • 1
  • Weihong Ji
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute for Natural SciencesMassey UniversityNorth Shore Mail Centre, AucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Ecological Genetics LaboratoryLandcare ResearchAucklandNew Zealand

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