Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 2, Supplement 1, pp 397–399 | Cite as

Characterization of 13 polymorphic microsatellite loci in the European pine marten Martes martes

  • Chiara Natali
  • Elisa Banchi
  • Claudio Ciofi
  • Emiliano Manzo
  • Paola Bartolommei
  • Roberto Cozzolino
Technical Note

Abstract

A set of 13 polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized from a genomic library enriched for dinucleotide repeats in the European pine marten Martes martes. Microsatellite loci amplification was tested on a panel of 12 tissue samples and 9 distinct hair samples collected from either road-killed or trapped animals in Tuscany, Italy. Allelic diversity was 6 and the number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 10. Mean observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.610 (range: 0.238–0.905) and 0.698 (range: 0.400–0.856), respectively. This novel set of microsatellite loci will be particularly useful for non-invasive genetic studies to assess population distribution and patterns of population structure and dispersal of M. martes in woodlands and fragmented habitats.

Keywords

Pine marten Mustelidae Microsatellites Population genetics Non-invasive genetics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chiara Natali
    • 1
  • Elisa Banchi
    • 1
  • Claudio Ciofi
    • 1
  • Emiliano Manzo
    • 2
  • Paola Bartolommei
    • 2
  • Roberto Cozzolino
    • 2
  1. 1.Molecular Ecology Laboratory, Department of Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  2. 2.Ethoikos Srl, Convento dell’OsservanzaRadicondoli (SI)Italy

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