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Mindfulness

pp 1–2 | Cite as

Compassion in the Treatment for Chronic Pain: an Ethical Imperative with Neurobiological Effects

  • Ángela Palao Tarrero
  • Marta Torrijos ZarceroEmail author
  • Ainoa Muñoz-Sanjose
  • Cristina Rocamora González
  • Maria Paz Vidal-Villegas
  • Roberto Mediavilla
  • Beatriz Rodríguez Vega
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
  • 6 Downloads

Despite there being many chronic pain and palliative medical care treatment programs, which highlight compassion as a key dimension, oftentimes, such compassion is reduced to a recommendation left to the will and personal ethical responsibility of the professional (Sinclair et al. 2016). Recent neurobiological research regarding chronic pain supplies evidence on the impact which Mindfulness and Compassion programs have on the nervous centers and pathways in charge of the evaluation of pain perception. Integrating the data found in research so that it may be used as a basis on which to build clinical treatments would help make compassion visible as a key relational competence, both in treatment programs and in those meant to train future professionals (Mackintosh et al. 2018).

When pain becomes chronic, nociceptive information processing is relayed to the sidelines due to the importance acquired by the processing of affective and motivational components (DosSantos et al. 2017). Whilst...

Notes

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ángela Palao Tarrero
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Marta Torrijos Zarcero
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  • Ainoa Muñoz-Sanjose
    • 3
    • 5
  • Cristina Rocamora González
    • 3
    • 6
  • Maria Paz Vidal-Villegas
    • 3
    • 6
  • Roberto Mediavilla
    • 3
    • 6
    • 7
  • Beatriz Rodríguez Vega
    • 3
    • 8
  1. 1.Psycho-Oncology and Chronic Pain Link Program, Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Psychology and Mental HealthUniversity Hospital La PazMadridSpain
  2. 2.Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM)MadridSpain
  3. 3.La Paz University Hospital Institute for Health Research (IdiPAZ)MadridSpain
  4. 4.Hematology-Oncology and Pyscho-Oncology and Pain Link Program, Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Psychology and Mental HealthUniversity Hospital La PazMadridSpain
  5. 5.Mental Health Day Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Psychology and Mental HealthUniversity Hospital La PazMadridSpain
  6. 6.Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Psychology and Mental HealthUniversity Hospital La PazMadridSpain
  7. 7.National University of Distance Education (UNED)MadridSpain
  8. 8.Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Psychology and Mental HealthUniversity Hospital La PazMadridSpain

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