Mindfulness

, Volume 7, Issue 6, pp 1396–1407 | Cite as

Integrating Mindfulness into Positive Psychology: a Randomised Controlled Trial of an Online Positive Mindfulness Program

  • Itai Ivtzan
  • Tarli Young
  • Janis Martman
  • Allison Jeffrey
  • Tim Lomas
  • Rona Hart
  • Francisco Jose Eiroa-Orosa
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to test the efficacy of an 8-week online intervention-based Positive Mindfulness Program (PMP) that integrated mindfulness with a series of positive psychology variables, with a view to improving well-being scores measured in these variables. The positive mindfulness cycle, based on positive intentions and savouring, provides the theoretical foundation for the PMP. The study was based on a randomised wait-list controlled trial, and 168 participants (128 females, mean age = 40.82) completed the intervention which included daily videos, meditations and activities. The variables tested included well-being measures, such as gratitude, self-compassion, self-efficacy, meaning and autonomy. Pre- and post-intervention data, including 1 month after the end of the intervention, were collected from both experimental and control groups. The post-test measurements of the experimental participants showed a significant improvement in all the dependent variables compared with the pre-test ones and were also significantly higher than those of the control group. One month after the intervention, the experimental group participants retained their improvement in 10 out of the 11 measurements. These positive results indicate that PMP may be effective in enhancing well-being and other positive variables in adult, non-clinical populations.

Keywords

Well-being Mindfulness Meditation Positive psychology Randomised controlled trial Intervention program 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUEL (University East London)LondonUK

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