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Mindfulness

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 161–173 | Cite as

Mindfulness: A Dialogue between Buddhism and Clinical Psychology

  • Chris Kang
  • Koa WhittinghamEmail author
Review Article

Abstract

Evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness as a clinical intervention is quickly growing. Much of our current understanding and application of mindfulness within clinical psychology has arisen from dialogue with Buddhist traditions, with the notable exception of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. We wrote this article with two purposes: (1) to provide a concise review of mindfulness within the Buddhist traditions for interested clinicians and researchers and (2) to explore whether further dialogue between Buddhism and clinical psychology could enhance mindfulness as it is used within clinical psychology. We concluded that mindfulness, as it is understood and applied in Buddhism, is a richer concept than thus far understood and applied in psychology. In addition, within Buddhism the development of mindfulness must be understood in tandem with the development of wisdom, compassion, and ethics. We suggest an operational definition of mindfulness within Buddhism. We also explore implications for clinical psychology and possible future directions for mindfulness research and practice.

Keywords

Mindfulness Third-wave interventions Buddhism Meditation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of History, Philosophy, Religion and the ClassicsThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre, Pediatrics and Child HealthUniversity of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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