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Self-organized criticality of significant fording landslides in Three Gorges Reservoir area, China

  • Fei GuoEmail author
  • Zujiang Luo
  • Huizhong Li
  • Shimei Wang
Thematic Issue
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Environmental Research of the Three Gorges Reservoir

Abstract

The self-organized criticality of significant fording landslides in Three Gorges Reservoir is analyzed to improve the understanding of their spatial distribution. Such self-organized criticality will provide a new method to research fording landslides, and it will also provide a reference for studying the development and risk assessment of fording landslides in Three Gorges Reservoir. The relationship between the significant fording landslides and the impact of factors such as strata, weak interbed, reservoir structure, reservoir water level, and rainstorm, is qualitatively analyzed. Reservoir water and rainstorm play a dominant role in reactivating the significant fording landslides. The frequency–magnitude distribution of significant fording landslides is quantitatively analyzed by using the power-law, double Pareto, and inverse gamma functions. The frequency–magnitude distribution of significant fording landslides in Three Gorges Reservoir partly follows a power-law distribution, and it still exhibits a rollover. The cause of this rollover cannot be attributed to data deviation and has little relationship to the classification by trigger mechanism, the composition materials, strata, or river bank structure. The power-law function does not reflect the rollover; however, the double Pareto and inverse gamma functions are superior to the power-law function in terms of fitting precision. The adaptability of the inverse gamma function is better when the data are fewer. The significant fording landslides in Three Gorges Reservoir exhibit self-organized criticality.

Keywords

Three Gorges Reservoir Significant fording landslides Impact factors Self-organized criticality Power-law Frequency–magnitude 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank the Editor and the two reviewers for their valuable comments to improve this manuscript. This work was supported by the major scientific research projects of the Phase III Geological Hazards Prevention and Control of the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (No: SXKY3-2-1), 2010 Non-profit Scientific Special Research Funds of Ministry of Water Resources (No: 201001008), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No: 41372359).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fei Guo
    • 1
    Email author
  • Zujiang Luo
    • 1
  • Huizhong Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Shimei Wang
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Earth Science and EngineeringHohai UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.Changjiang Institute of SurveyPlanning, Design and Research Co., LtdWuhanChina
  3. 3.Three Gorges Geotechnical Consultants Co., LtdWuhanChina
  4. 4.Key Laboratory of Geological Hazards of Three Gorges Reservoir Area of Ministry of EducationChina Three Gorges UniversityYichangChina

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