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Environmental Earth Sciences

, Volume 71, Issue 8, pp 3349–3354 | Cite as

Experimental study on mechanical properties of granite after freeze–thaw cycling

  • You-Liang Chen
  • Jing Ni
  • Li-Hao Jiang
  • Ming-Liang Liu
  • Peng Wang
  • Rafig Azzam
Original Article

Abstract

It is important to understand the effect of freeze–thaw cycles on the mechanical properties of rocks. In this paper, the variation of the uniaxial compressive strength, peak strain, elastic modulus and stress–strain curves of granite subjected to freeze–thaw cycles with different heating temperatures were studied experimentally and the relationships were derived. As the number of freeze–thaw cycles increases, the compressive strength and elastic modulus decrease, while the peak strain decreases. In addition, an increased temperature increases the peak strain while decreasing the compressive strength and elastic modulus. An expression for the initial damage for the adopted rock material due to freeze–thaw cycling was proposed based on the Loland model. The current research has established a solid foundation for further experimental studies on the fatigue behavior of granite after freeze–thaw cycling.

Keywords

Freeze–thaw cycle Granite Damage variable Experimental study 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The financial support from K. C. Wong Education Foundation (KCWEF), DAAD, the Key Innovation Program of Shanghai Municipal Education Commission (11ZZ134), National Natural Science Foundation of China (10872133) for this study is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • You-Liang Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jing Ni
    • 1
  • Li-Hao Jiang
    • 1
  • Ming-Liang Liu
    • 1
  • Peng Wang
    • 1
  • Rafig Azzam
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversity of Shanghai for Science and TechnologyShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Engineering Geology and HydrogeologyRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany

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