Advertisement

Environmental Earth Sciences

, Volume 65, Issue 2, pp 481–491 | Cite as

Surface and groundwater pollution by organochlorine compounds in a typical soybean system from the south Pampa, Argentina

  • Mariana GonzalezEmail author
  • Karina S. B. Miglioranza
  • Valeria M. Shimabukuro
  • Orlando M. Quiroz Londoño
  • Daniel E. Martinez
  • Julia E. Aizpún
  • Víctor J. Moreno
Special Issue

Abstract

Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) use has been restricted or forbidden in Argentina since 1998 and technical endosulfan is the last currently used OCPs on the soybean-wheat production. As they persist in soil for several years after application, OCPs constitute a source of environmental pollution. This work aims to assess OCPs contamination of groundwater (Gw) and streamwater (Sw) in the Quequén Grande River watershed from south Argentinean Pampas in relation to the hydrogeological characteristics. OCPs were analyzed in Sw, Gw, surface bottom sediments, soils and borehole cutting sediments (Cs) by gas chromatograph-electron capture detector. Pesticide distribution in Cs was dependent on the characteristic of the non-saturated zone. Leached pesticides over 3 m in Cs showed the pattern: HCHs = endosulfan > chlordanes > DDTs, and from 3 to 6 m heptachlor was the main group as a consequence of the past use of this compound in the area, mainly on potato crops. Endosulfan reaches Gw during application season as well as during flooding events while a retard effect was observed for Sw. Levels of α- and β-isomers were in certain cases above national (7 ng L−1) and international (3 ng L−1) limits for aquatic biota protection. As the endosulfan sulfate metabolite was present in Gw and Sw and due to its high toxicity, it should be considered in the establishment of water quality criteria for human and environmental protection.

Keywords

Organochlorine compounds Water quality Groundwater contamination Watershed Argentina 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by PIP 5668 Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), and PICT 390 07 Agencia Nacional de Promoción Científica y Tecnológica (ANPCyT) from Argentina. Moreover, the authors thank Mrs. Joannie Lopez Pueyrredón and her husband, and Paola Ondarza for their help during field sampling and Natalia Andere for their help with English revision.

References

  1. Aizen MA, Garibaldi LA, Dondo M (2009) Expansión de la soja y diversidad de la agricultura argentina. Ecol Aust 19:45–54Google Scholar
  2. Antonius GF, Byers ME (1997) Fate and movement of endosulfan under field condition. Environ Toxicol Chem 16:644–649CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. ATDSR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry) (2000) Toxicological profile for endosulfan. US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Atlanta, GAGoogle Scholar
  4. Auge M (2004) Vulnerabilidad de Acuíferos: Conceptos y Métodos Buenos Aires. Disponible en. http://wwwglfcenubaar/investigacion/grupos/hidrogeologia/auge/Vulnerabilidad-Conceptospdf
  5. Brown E, Skougstad M, Fishman M (1970) Methods for collection and analysis of water samples for dissolved minerals and gases. Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, book 5. US Geological Survey, Washington, DC, p 160Google Scholar
  6. CCME (Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment) (2010) Canadian water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Endosulfan. Excerpt from publication, No 1299. ISBN 1-896997-34-1)Google Scholar
  7. Dalla Salda LE, Iñiguez RM (1979) “La Tinta” precambrico y paleozoico de Buenos Aires VII Congr Geol Arg I, Neuquén, pp 539–550Google Scholar
  8. Fava L, Orru MA, Crobe A, Barra Caracciolo A, Bottoni P, Funari E (2005) Pesticide metabolites as contaminants of groundwater resources: assessment of the leaching potential of endosulfan sulfate 26-dichlorobenzoic acid 34-dichloroaniline 24-dichlorophenol and 4-chloro-2-methylphenol. Microchem J 79:207–211CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Galehouse JS (1971) Sedimentation analysis. In: Carver RE (ed) Procedures in sedimentary petrology, chapter 4. University of Georgia, USAGoogle Scholar
  10. Gonzalez M, Miglioranza KSB, Aizpón JE, Isla F, Peña A (2010) Assessing pesticides leaching and desorption by organic amendments in soils with different agricultural activities from Argentina (Pampa and Patagonia). Chemosphere 81:351–358CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Jergentz S, Mugni H, Bonneto C, Schulz R (2005) Assessment of insecticide contamination runoff and stream water of small agricultural streams in the main soybean area of Argentina. Chemosphere 61:817–826CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Keith LH, Crumett W, Wentler G (1983) Principles of environmental analysis. Anal Chem 55:2210–2218CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Kent TR, Payne E (1988) Sampling groundwater monitoring wells. Special quality assurance and quality considerations, pp 231–246. In: Keith LH (ed) Principles of environmental sampling. ACS Professional Reference Book. American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, p 480Google Scholar
  14. Kruse E, Laurencena P, Deluchi M, Varela L (1997) Caracterización de la red de drenaje para la evaluación hidrológica en la región interserrana (provincia de Buenos Aires). [Characterization of the drainage netwotk for the evaluation of the intermountain plain (Province of Buenos Aires)] I Congreso Nacional de Hidrogeología y III Seminario Hispano—Argentino sobre temas actuales de hidrología subterránea. Actas, Bahía Blanca, Argentina, pp 133–145Google Scholar
  15. Leonard RA (1990) Movement of pesticides into surface waters. In: Pesticides in the soil environment, 3rd edn, no. 2. Soil Science Society of America Book Series, Madison, pp 303–349Google Scholar
  16. Llambias E, Prozzi C (1975) Ventania Relatorio Geología de la Provincia de Buenos Aires. VI Congreso Geologio Argentino Asociación Geológica Argentina Bahía Blanca, pp 79–102Google Scholar
  17. Martínez DE, Quiroz Londoño OM, Dapeña C, Massone HE, Ferrante A, Bocanegra E (2007) Aportes al modelo hidrogeológico conceptual de la cuenca del río Quequen Grande provincia de Buenos Aires. V Congreso Argentino de Hidrogeología en prensa Paraná prov de Entre Ríos 15 al 18 de octubre de 2007. Actas, pp 262-271. ISBN 978-987-23936-3-2Google Scholar
  18. Martínez DE, Quiroz Londoño OM, Dapeña C, Massone HE, Panarello H, Bocanegra E, Ferrante A (2011) Groundwater and baseflow studies in the Quequen River basin Argentina applying isotopic and hydrogeochemical techniques. IAEA Project CRP Technical Document, Vienna (in press)Google Scholar
  19. Metcalfe TL, Metcalfe CD (1997) The trophodynamics of PCBs including mono and non-ortho congeners in the food web of north-central Lake Ontario. Sci Total Environ 201:245–272CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Miglioranza K, Aizpun J, Moreno V (2003) Dynamics of organochlorine pesticides in soils from a southeastern region of Argentina. Environ Toxicol Chem 22:712–717CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Nowak B, Goodsell A, Moreno J (1995) Residues of endosulfan in carp as an indicator of exposure conditions. Ecotoxicology 4:363–371CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Pimentel D (1995) Amounts of pesticides reaching target pests: environmental impacts and ethics. J Agric Environ Ethics 8:17–29CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Quiroz Londoño OM, Martínez DE, Dapeña C, Massone HE (2008) Hydrogeochemistry and isotopes of groundwater in low gradients catchments of the province of Buenos Aires Argentina. Hydrogeol J 16(6):1113–1127CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Ruiz de Galarreta A, Varni M, Banda NR, Barranquero R (2007) Caracterización Geohidrológica Preliminar en la Cuenca del Arroyo Langueyú partido de Tandil Buenos Aires V Congreso Argentino de Hidrogeología, pp 119–128Google Scholar
  25. Sarandón S (2003) Agroecología El camino hacia una agricultura sustentable ECA Ediciones Científicas AmericanasGoogle Scholar
  26. Thorthwaite CW (1948) An approach towards a rational classification of climate. Geogr Rev 38:55–94CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Walkley A, Black CA (1965) Organic carbon. In: Black CA (ed) Methods of soil analysis. American Society of Agronomy, Madison, pp 1372–1375Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mariana Gonzalez
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Karina S. B. Miglioranza
    • 1
    • 2
  • Valeria M. Shimabukuro
    • 2
    • 4
  • Orlando M. Quiroz Londoño
    • 1
    • 3
  • Daniel E. Martinez
    • 1
    • 3
  • Julia E. Aizpún
    • 2
  • Víctor J. Moreno
    • 2
  1. 1.Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (IIMyC)Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET)Mar del PlataArgentina
  2. 2.Laboratorio de Ecotoxicología, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y NaturalesUniversidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (UNMdP)Mar del PlataArgentina
  3. 3.Instituto de Geología de Costas y Cuaternario (IGCyC)Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (UNMdP)Mar del PlataArgentina
  4. 4.FONCyTMar del PlataArgentina

Personalised recommendations