Advertisement

Environmental Earth Sciences

, Volume 66, Issue 4, pp 1149–1153 | Cite as

Indoor radon probability calculated from the Czech soil gas radon data in a grid net for the European Geogenic Radon Map construction: test of feasibility

  • Ivan Barnet
Original Article

Abstract

The construction of the European Geogenic Radon Map in a proposed grid system 10 × 10 km requires the data test to derive the probability of exceeding the indoor action level 200 Bq m−3 from the geologically based data. The Czech Republic disposes both indoor and soil gas data sets to test the real probability to exceed 200 Bq m−3 from indoor radon measurements and to compare it with the probability calculated from soil gas radon concentrations. Comparison of real and calculated probability enables to delineate the areas, where under- or overestimation can be expected. The results of data processing show minor differences between processing the raw data in generalised polygons of geological units and in a grid net, when using the generalised geological characteristics of grid cells.

Keywords

Soil gas Rn Indoor Rn probability European Geogenic Radon Map 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Thanks to the Ministry of Environment of the Czech Republic and the State Office for Nuclear Safety for funding the research works within the Radon Programme of the Czech Republic and within project 333000 Radon Risk of the Czech Geological Survey.

References

  1. Barnet I, Fojtíková I (2008) Soil gas radon, indoor radon and gamma dose rate in CZ: contribution to geostatistical methods for European atlas of natural radiations. Radiat Prot Dosim 130(1):81–84CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Barnet I, Pacherová P, Neznal M, Neznal M (2008) Radon in geological environment—Czech experience. CGS Special Papers 19. Czech Geological Survey, PragueGoogle Scholar
  3. Barnet I, Pacherová P, Preusse W, Stec B (2010) Cross-border radon index map 1:100,000 Lausitz–Jizera–Karkonosze-region (northern part of the Bohemian Massif). J Environ Radioact 101(10):809–812CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cháb J, Stráník Z, Eliáš M (2007) Geological map of the Czech Republic 1:500,000. Czech Geological Survey, PragueGoogle Scholar
  5. Dehandschutter B (2006) Detailed-scale radon mapping in radon-prone municipalities using combined indoor and soil-gas measurements. In: Barnet I, Neznal N, Pacherová P (eds) Radon investigations in the Czech Republic XI and the 8th international workshop on the geological aspects of radon risk mapping. Czech Geological Survey, Prague, pp 79–87Google Scholar
  6. Dubois G (2005) An overview of radon surveys in Europe. JRC—European Commission, Institute for Environment and Sustainability. EUR 21892 ENGoogle Scholar
  7. Dubois G, Bossew P, Friedmann H (2007) A geostatistical autopsy of the Austrian indoor radon survey. Sci Total Environ 377(2–3):378–385Google Scholar
  8. Friedmann H, Gröller J (2006) Radon mapping in Austria. In: Barnet I, Neznal M, Pacherová P (eds) Radon investigations in the Czech Republic XI and the 8th international workshop on the geological aspects of radon risk mapping. Czech Geological Survey, Prague, pp 98–102Google Scholar
  9. GEOČR 500 (1998) Atlas of maps of the Czech Republic 1:500,000 (in Czech). CD ROM. Czech Geological Survey, PragueGoogle Scholar
  10. Gröller J, Friedmann H (2007) Improving the Austrian radon potential map by Bayes statistics. In: Martinčík L, Thinová J (eds) 5th conference on protection against radon at home and at work. Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, PragueGoogle Scholar
  11. Gruber V, Baumgartner A, Seidel C, Maringer FJ (2008) Radon risk in Alpine regions in Austria: risk assessment as a settlement planning strategy. Radiat Prot Dosim 130(1):88–91CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Ielsch G, Cushing ME, Combes Ph, Cuney M (2010) Mapping of the geogenic radon potential in France to improve radon risk management: methodology and first application to region Bourgogne. J Environ Radioact 101(10):813–820CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Kemski J, Siehl A, Stegemann R, Valdivia-Manchego M (2001) Mapping the geogenic radon potential in Germany. Sci Total Environ 272:217–230CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Kemski J, Klingel R, Siehl A, Valdivia-Manchego M (2006) Radon risk prediction in Germany based on gridded geological maps and soil gas measurements. In: Barnet I, Neznal M, Pacherová P (eds) Radon investigations in the Czech Republic XI and the 8th international workshop on the geological aspects of radon risk mapping. Czech Geological Survey, Prague, pp 139–156Google Scholar
  15. Kemski J, Klingel R, Siehl A, Valdivia-Manchego M (2009) From radon hazard to risk prediction-based on geological maps, soil gas and indoor measurements in Germany. Environ Geol 56:1269–1279. doi: 10.1007/s00254-008-1226-z CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Matolín M, Koudelová P (2008) Radon in soil gas—investigation and data standardisation at radon reference sites, Czech Republic. Radiat Prot Dosim 130(1):52–55CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Minda M, Tóth G, Horváth I, Barnet I, Hámori K, Tóth E (2009) Indoor radon mapping and its relation to geology in Hungary. Environ Geol 57:601–609CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Neznal M, Neznal M, Matolín M, Barnet I, Mikšová J (2004) The new method for assessing the radon risk of building sites. Czech Geol. Survey Special Papers 1. CGS, PragueGoogle Scholar
  19. Popit A, Vaupotic J (2002a) The influence of geology on elevated radon concentrations in Slovenian schools and kindergartens. Geologija 45(2):499–504CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Popit A, Vaupotic J (2002b) Indoor radon concentrations in relation to geology in Slovenia. Environ Geol 42:330–337CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Scheib C, Appleton D, Jones D, Hodgkinson E (2006) Airborne uranium data in support of radon potential mapping in Derbyshire, Central England. In: Barnet I, Neznal M, Pacherová P (eds) Radon investigations in the Czech Republic XI and the 8th international workshop on the geological aspects of radon risk mapping. Czech Geological Survey, Prague, pp 210–219Google Scholar
  22. Scheib C, Appleton JD, Miles JHC, Green BMR, Barlow TS, Jones DG (2009) Geological controls on radon potential in Scotland. Scot J Geol 45(2):147–160CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Sundal AV, Henriksen H, Lauritzen SE, Soldal O, Strand T, Valen V (2004) Geological and geochemical factors affecting radon concentrations in dwellings located on permeable glacial sediments—a case study from Kinsarvik, Norway. Environ Geol 45:843–858CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Swedjemark GA, Åkerblom G (1994) The Swedish radon programme: thirteen years of experience and suggestions for future strategy. Radiat Prot Dosim 56(1–4):201–205Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Czech Geological SurveyPrague 1Czech Republic

Personalised recommendations