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Environmental Earth Sciences

, Volume 61, Issue 6, pp 1301–1308 | Cite as

Effects of natural and calcined oyster shells on Cd and Pb immobilization in contaminated soils

  • Yong Sik Ok
  • Sang-Eun Oh
  • Mahtab Ahmad
  • Seunghun Hyun
  • Kwon-Rae Kim
  • Deok Hyun Moon
  • Sang Soo Lee
  • Kyoung Jae Lim
  • Weon-Tai Jeon
  • Jae E. Yang
Original Article

Abstract

In Korea, soils adjacent to abandoned mines are commonly contaminated by heavy metals present in mine tailings. Further, the disposal of oyster shell waste by oyster farm industries has been associated with serious environmental problems. In this study, we attempted to remediate cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contaminated soils typical of those commonly found adjacent to abandoned mines using oyster shell waste as a soil stabilizer. Natural oyster shell powder (NOSP) and calcined oyster shell powder (COSP) were applied as soil amendments to immobilize Cd and Pb. The primary components of NOSP and COSP are calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and calcium oxide (CaO), respectively. X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscope analyses conducted in this study revealed that the calcination of NOSP at 770°C converted the less reactive CaCO3 to the more reactive CaO. The calcination process also decreased the sodium content in COSP, indicating that it was advantageous to use COSP as a liming material in agricultural soil. After 30 days of incubation, we found that the 0.1 N HCl-extractable Cd and Pb contents in soil decreased significantly as a result of an increase in the soil pH and the formation of metal hydroxides. COSP was more effective in immobilizing Cd and Pb in the contaminated soil than NOSP. Overall, the results of this study suggest that oyster shell waste can be recycled into an effective soil ameliorant.

Keywords

Oyster shell Waste recycling Cadmium Lead pH Soil quality Stabilization 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (Project number: 2009-0071439). Instrumental analysis was supported by a grant from the Institute of Environmental Research, the Research Institute of Agricultural Science, and the Central Laboratory of Kangwon National University, Korea. The authors also thank Jung Eun Lim for conducting incubation experiments.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yong Sik Ok
    • 1
  • Sang-Eun Oh
    • 1
  • Mahtab Ahmad
    • 1
  • Seunghun Hyun
    • 2
  • Kwon-Rae Kim
    • 2
  • Deok Hyun Moon
    • 3
  • Sang Soo Lee
    • 1
  • Kyoung Jae Lim
    • 1
  • Weon-Tai Jeon
    • 4
  • Jae E. Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Agriculture and Life ScienceKangwon National UniversityChuncheonKorea
  2. 2.Division of Environmental Science and Ecological EngineeringKorea UniversitySeoulKorea
  3. 3.Department of Environmental EngineeringChosun UniversityGwangjuKorea
  4. 4.National Institute of Crop Science, Rural Development AdministrationsSuwonKorea

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