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Environmental Earth Sciences

, Volume 63, Issue 1, pp 97–107 | Cite as

Sensible and latent heat flux response to diurnal variation in soil surface temperature and moisture under different freeze/thaw soil conditions in the seasonal frozen soil region of the central Tibetan Plateau

  • Donglin Guo
  • Meixue YangEmail author
  • Huijun Wang
Original Article

Abstract

The relationship between sensible and latent heat flux and diurnal variation in soil surface temperature and moisture under four freeze/thaw soil conditions was investigated using observed soil temperature and moisture and simulated sensible and latent heat flux. The diurnal range of latent heat flux had a similar temporal change pattern as that of unfrozen soil water at depths of 0–3 cm during the freezing stage. Also, there was a better relationship with the diurnal range of unfrozen soil water at depths of 3–6 cm during the thawing stage. Diurnal variation in latent heat flux was significant and depended mostly on solar radiation during the completely thawed stage. However, while diurnal variation in solar radiation during the completely frozen stage was significant, for latent heat flux it was quite weak due to low unfrozen soil water content. Thus, diurnal variation in latent heat flux depended mostly on unfrozen soil water content during this stage. During the freezing and thawing stages, diurnal variation in latent heat flux was also significant and depended mostly on diurnal variation in unfrozen soil water content. However, the impacts of air temperature change from solar radiation on latent heat flux could not be ignored.

Keywords

Tibetan Plateau Freeze/thaw Soil water Latent heat flux 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was sponsored jointly by the National Key Basic Research program of China (2010CB951404), the One Hundred Talent Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (29O827B11), the Key International Cooperation Project of NSFC (40810059006), and the National Key Basic Research Program of China (2009CB421406). Sensible and latent heat flux data were provided by NCAR/EOL under sponsorship of the National Science Foundation. Opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. We are indebted to the reviewers for helpful comments and criticisms of the initial draft of this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nansen-Zhu International Research Center, Institute of Atmospheric PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Sciences, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research InstituteChinese Academy of SciencesLanzhouChina
  3. 3.Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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