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Indian Journal of Physics

, Volume 93, Issue 2, pp 139–145 | Cite as

Cosmic ray intensity increases during high solar activity period for the solar cycles 22 and 23

  • Sham SinghEmail author
  • A. P. Mishra
Original Paper

Abstract

The varying solar output is affected by the Sun’s activity and associated phenomena. Predictions of solar and geomagnetic activity are important for various technologies, including the operation of low-earth-orbiting satellites, electric power transmission grids, geophysical exploration and high-frequency radio communications. Annual averages of geomagnetic activity in cycle 23 were found to be large in comparison with other cycles. The dramatic variability from one cycle to the other in these parameters gives us unique opportunity to understand the physics of various associated phenomena. In this paper, we have analysed the solar cycles 22 and 23 and compared them with solar cycle 24 on the basis of 10.7 radio flux, sunspot number (Rz), solar flare index, cosmic ray intensity and interplanetary and geomagnetic parameters.

Keywords

Cosmic ray intensity Solar cycle Geomagnetic indices 

PACS Nos.

98.70.Sa 

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Copyright information

© Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Applied SciencesChandigarh Engineering College LandranMohaliIndia
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsA.P.S. UniversityRewaIndia

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