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Prevalence of haemoprotozoan diseases in cattle of Cauvery delta region of Tamil Nadu

  • K. JayalakshmiEmail author
  • M. Sasikala
  • M. Veeraselvam
  • M. Venkatesan
  • S. Yogeshpriya
  • P. K. Ramkumar
  • P. Selvaraj
  • M. K. Vijayasarathi
Original Article
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Abstract

A study was carried out to determine the prevalence of haemoparasites in cattle in Cauvery delta region over a period of one year. A total of 228 giemsa stained blood smears were screened for the presence of haemoprotozoa, out of which 34 animals were found to be positive. An overall prevalence of haemoparasites in the sampled cattle were 14.9%, among this Anaplasma sp (8.3%), Babesia sp (3.95%), Theileria sp (2.19%) and Trypanosoma sp (0.44%) as single or mixed blood parasitic infections. In this study Anaplasmosis (14%) was highly prevalent during the winter season and Babesiosis (13.73%) was highly prevalent during summer months followed by Anaplasmosis (9.8%) and Theileriosis (7.8%), the lowest prevalence of Trypanosomiasis was observed during the rainy season. The seasonal variation in prevalence of haemoprotozoan disease might be due to influence of climatic factors on density of vector population in that geographical area. Haemogram revealed decreased level of haemoglobulin, packed cell volume and total erythrocyte count. The serum biochemistry revealed elevated level of liver enzyme Asparate transaminase enzyme. All haemoparasitaemic animals were treated with specific drugs and recovered successfully.

Keywords

Cattle Prevalence Anaplasmosis Babesiosis Theileriosis Cauvery delta region 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful to the Dean, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Orathanadu and the Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chennai-51, Tamil Nadu for providing facilities.

Authors’ contribution

KJ was involved in sample collection, screening of haemoprotozoa, treatment planning, case follow up and preparation of Manuscript. MS was involved in haematological analysis and go through the manuscript for correction. MV was carried out biochemical analysis of serum samples and go through the manuscript. MV, SY and PKR involved in sample collection. PS was involved in treatment planning and manuscript correction. MKV Confirmed the specific morphology of blood parasites.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Indian Society for Parasitology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Jayalakshmi
    • 1
    • 5
    Email author
  • M. Sasikala
    • 2
    • 5
  • M. Veeraselvam
    • 1
    • 5
  • M. Venkatesan
    • 1
    • 5
  • S. Yogeshpriya
    • 1
    • 5
  • P. K. Ramkumar
    • 3
    • 5
  • P. Selvaraj
    • 1
    • 5
  • M. K. Vijayasarathi
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary MedicineVeterinary College and Research InstituteOrathanaduIndia
  2. 2.Department of Veterinary PathologyVeterinary College and Research InstituteOrathanaduIndia
  3. 3.Veterinary Clinical ComplexVeterinary College and Research InstituteOrathanaduIndia
  4. 4.Department of Veterinary ParasitologyVeterinary College and Research InstituteOrathanaduIndia
  5. 5.Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences UniversityChennaiIndia

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