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Journal of Parasitic Diseases

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 813–817 | Cite as

Epidemiology of malaria in East Azerbaijan province, Iran, from 2001 to 2013

  • Seddigheh Sarafraz
  • Nader Ghabouli Mehrabani
  • Yaghoub Mirzaei
  • Rasool Jafari
  • Reza Ghabouli Mehrabani
  • Vahid Rahnamaye Hayati
  • Mahdi Parsaei
  • Mohammad Fatollahzadeh
Original Article

Abstract

Malaria is one of the most important parasitic diseases worldwide, which is characterized by high morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions. The aim of this study was to evaluate epidemiology of malaria in East Azerbaijan province, Iran, from 2001 to 2013. During 13 years, blood samples were taken from all suspected malaria cases using lancet and then peripheral blood smear was prepared using one blood drop. The smears were stained by Giemsa’s stain and were examined under a light microscope with 1000X of magnification. All demographic variables and epidemiological recorded data were obtained from Health Center and were analyzed by SPSS v. 16 software using descriptive statistical tests. Total of 133 cases were fined to be infected by malaria in 13 years that the highest rate (54.13 %) was observed in Kaleybar county. One hundred and fifteen (86.46 %) and 18 (13.54 %) out of 133 infected individuals were male and female, respectively. Mean age of the infected people was 31.57 years. The most affected age group was 30–40 years. One hundred twenty seven (95.48 %) and 6 (4.52 %) cases were infected by Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum, respectively. Based on the findings of this study, the incidence of malaria has been declined continuously over the past decade in East Azerbaijan province, Iran.

Keywords

Malaria Epidemiology Plasmodium falciparum Plasmodium vivax Iran 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Health Center staff of East Azerbaijan province and who had helped us in this study.

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Copyright information

© Indian Society for Parasitology 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seddigheh Sarafraz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nader Ghabouli Mehrabani
    • 1
  • Yaghoub Mirzaei
    • 2
  • Rasool Jafari
    • 3
  • Reza Ghabouli Mehrabani
    • 4
  • Vahid Rahnamaye Hayati
    • 1
  • Mahdi Parsaei
    • 2
  • Mohammad Fatollahzadeh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Parasitology, Faculty of MedicineTabriz University of Medical SciencesTabrizIran
  2. 2.East Azerbaijan Province Health Center, Tabriz Health CenterTabrizIran
  3. 3.Department of Parasitology and Mycology, School of MedicineIsfahan University of Medical SciencesIsfahanIran
  4. 4.Faculty of Veterinary MedicineTabriz Branch, Islamic Azad UniversityTabrizIran

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