Journal of Parasitic Diseases

, Volume 38, Issue 3, pp 250–254

High prevalence of pfcrt K76T and mdr1 N86Y mutations in Sonitpur district of Assam, India

  • Diganta Goswami
  • Sunil Dhiman
  • Bipul Rabha
  • Dinesh Kumar
  • Indra Baruah
  • Vijay Veer
  • RK Bhola
  • DK Sharma
Original Article
  • 57 Downloads

Abstract

Present study reports the prevalence and distribution of pfcrt K76T and mdr1 N86Y mutations in malaria endemic areas of Sonitpur district of Assam. Out of 163 individuals tested for malaria, 67 (SPR = 41.1 %) were detected positive for malaria infection using rapid detection kit in the field and PCR assay in the laboratory. Nested PCR–RFLP assay was used to amplify pfcrt K76T and mdr1 N86Y genes flanking the K76T and N86Y mutations. P. falciparum was most abundant (91.04 %) among the three Plasmodium species reported and its prevalence was significantly higher as compared to P. vivax and P. malariae2 = 150.76; p ≤ 0.0001; df = 2). Malaria was equally distributed among all the age groups and both the sexes. Hemoglobin contents in severe anaemic patients had a significant linear decreasing trend among patients with the increase in age (χ2 = 4.33; p = 0.03), whereas non severe anaemic patients exhibited significant linear increasing trend among the patients with the increase in age (χ2 = 18.38; p ≤ 0.0001). Pfcrt K76T mutation was recorded in 44 (72.13 %) isolates, whereas mdr1 N86Y mutation could be detected in 28 (41.79 %) isolates only. Only 32.7 % of the samples had both pfcrt K76T and mdr N86Y mutations. Number of pfcrt K76T mutant isolates was significantly higher than the wild type. However no significant difference was observed among the number of isolates with mdr1 N86Y mutant and wild isolates.

Keywords

Antimalarial resistance pfcrt K76T mdr1 N86Y Mutation PCR assay 

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Copyright information

© Indian Society for Parasitology 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diganta Goswami
    • 1
  • Sunil Dhiman
    • 1
  • Bipul Rabha
    • 1
  • Dinesh Kumar
    • 1
  • Indra Baruah
    • 1
  • Vijay Veer
    • 1
  • RK Bhola
    • 2
  • DK Sharma
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medical EntomologyDefence Research LaboratoryTezpurIndia
  2. 2.Department of ZoologyGauhati UniversityGuwahatiIndia

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