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In reply: Comparing videolaryngoscope and direct laryngoscope use for nasotracheal intubation in patients with manual in-line stabilization

  • Go Un Roh
  • Jong Yeop KimEmail author
Correspondence
  • 11 Downloads

Notes

Conflicts of interest

None declared.

Editorial responsibility

This submission was handled by Dr. Hilary P. Grocott, Editor-in-Chief, Canadian Journal of Anesthesia.

References

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    Shao LJ, Liu SH, Xue FS. Comparing videolaryngoscope and direct laryngoscope use for nasotracheal intubation in patients with manual in-line stabilization. Can J Anesth 2020; 67; DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1007/s12630-019-01461-1.
  2. 2.
    Roh GU, Kwak HJ, Lee KC, Lee SY, Kim JY. Randomized comparison of McGrath MAC videolaryngoscope, Pentax Airway Scope, and Macintosh direct laryngoscope for nasotracheal intubation in patients with manual in-line stabilization. Can J Anesth 2019; DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1007/s12630-019-01409-5.
  3. 3.
    Smith JE, Reid AP. Identifying the more patent nostril before nasotracheal intubation. Anaesthesia 2001; 56: 258-62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Tong JL, Tung A. A randomized trial comparing the effect of fiberoptic selection and guidance versus random selection, blind insertion, and direct laryngoscopy, on the incidence and severity of epistaxis after nasotracheal intubation. Anesth Analg 2018; 127: 485-9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Vijayakumar V. Intubation difficulty scale score and videolaryngoscopes. J Neurosurg Anesthesiol 2017; 29: 70-1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology and Pain MedicineCHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University School of MedicineSeongnamKorea
  2. 2.Department of Anesthesiology and Pain MedicineAjou University School of MedicineSuwonKorea

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