Current Attention Disorders Reports

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 5–11 | Cite as

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and comorbid oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder

Article

Abstract

Comorbid oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) are common in clinically referred children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Early recognition and treatment of co-occurring ADHD and ODD and/or CD is important because comorbidity influences symptom severity, prognosis, and treatment. Research on treatment supports the importance of behavior therapies for ODD and multimodal psychosocial interventions delivered simultaneously and intensively for CD with adjunctive medication for ADHD symptoms. Clinical trials are beginning to show that stimulants and atomoxetine are effective for ADHD and ODD symptoms when the disorders occur together. It is presently unclear if ODD in the absence of ADHD responds to pharmacotherapy. More research is needed examining the effects of commonly prescribed ADHD medications on CD symptoms. Research suggests a high prevalence of lifetime comorbidity with ODD in clinically referred patients with ADHD.

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Copyright information

© Current Medicine Group, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Connecticut School of Medicine, MC1410FarmingtonUSA

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