The journal of nutrition, health & aging

, Volume 18, Issue 6, pp 616–621

Physical performance measures and polypharmacy among hospitalized older adults: Results from the crime study

  • Federica Sganga
  • D. L. Vetrano
  • S. Volpato
  • A. Cherubini
  • C. Ruggiero
  • A. Corsonello
  • P. Fabbietti
  • F. Lattanzio
  • R. Bernabei
  • G. Onder
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12603-014-0029-z

Cite this article as:
Sganga, F., Vetrano, D.L., Volpato, S. et al. J Nutr Health Aging (2014) 18: 616. doi:10.1007/s12603-014-0029-z

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the association of polypharmacy and physical performance measures in a sample of elderly patients aged ≥65 years admitted to acute care hospitals. Design, setting and participants: Prospective study conducted among 1123 hospitalized older adults participating to the CRiteria to Assess Appropriate Medication Use among Elderly Complex Patients (CRIME) project. Measurements: Physical performance was measured at hospital admission by the 4-meter walking speed (WS) and the grip strength (GS). Polypharmacy was defined as the use of ≥10 drugs during hospital stay. Results: Mean age of 1123 participants was 81.5±7.4 years and 576 (51.3%) were on polypharmacy. Prevalence of polypharmacy was higher in patients with low WS and GS. After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest tertile of WS were less likely to be on polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35–0.96). Similarly, participants in the highest tertile of GS had a significantly lower likelihood of polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36–0.84). When examined as continuous variables, WS and GS were inversely associated with polypharmacy (WS: OR 0.77 per 1 SD increment; 95% CI 0.60–0.98; GS: OR 0.71 per 1 SD increment; 95% CI 0.56–0.90). Conclusion: Among hospitalized older adults WS and GS are inversely related to polypharmacy. These measures should be incorporated in standard assessment of in-hospital patients.

Key words

Polypharmacy elderly physical parameters walking speed grip strength 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Serdi and Springer-Verlag France 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Federica Sganga
    • 1
  • D. L. Vetrano
    • 1
  • S. Volpato
    • 2
  • A. Cherubini
    • 3
  • C. Ruggiero
    • 4
  • A. Corsonello
    • 5
  • P. Fabbietti
    • 6
  • F. Lattanzio
    • 6
  • R. Bernabei
    • 1
  • G. Onder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Gerontology, Neuroscience and OrthopedicsUniversità Cattolica Sacro CuoreRomeItaly
  2. 2.Section of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineUniversity of FerraraFerraraItaly
  3. 3.Geriatrics, Research Hospital of AnconaItalian National Research Center on Aging (INRCA)AnconaItaly
  4. 4.Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineUniversity of Perugia Medical SchoolPerugiaItaly
  5. 5.Unit of Geriatric PharmacoepidemiologyItalian National Research Center on Aging (INRCA)CosenzaItaly
  6. 6.Biostatistical CenterItalian National Research Centre on Aging (INRCA)AnconaItaly
  7. 7.Centro Medicina dell’Invecchiamento, Department of Gerontology, Neuroscience and OrthopedicsUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRomaItaly

Personalised recommendations