The journal of nutrition, health & aging

, Volume 17, Issue 7, pp 619–623

How to design nutritional intervention trials to slow cognitive decline in apparently healthy populations and apply for efficacy claims: A statement from the international academy on nutrition and aging task force

  • M. Ferry
  • N. Coley
  • S. Andrieu
  • C. Bonhomme
  • J. P. Caubere
  • M. Cesari
  • J. Gautry
  • I. Garcia Sanchez
  • L. Hugonot
  • L. Mansuy
  • M. Pahor
  • J. Pariente
  • P. Ritz
  • A. Salva
  • J. Sijben
  • R. Wieggers
  • P. Ythier-Moury
  • M. Zaim
  • J. Zetlaoui
  • B. Vellas
Article

Abstract

interventions are crucial as they offer simple and inexpensive public health solutions that will be useful over the long term use. A Task Force on designing trials of nutritional interventions to slow cognitive decline in older adults was held in Toulouse in September 2012. The aim of the Task Force was to bring together leading experts from academia, the food industry and regulatory agencies to determine the best trial designs that would enable us to reach our goal of maintaining or improving cognitive function in apparently healthy aging people. An associated challenge for this Task Force was to determine the type of trials required by the Public Food Agencies for assessing the impact of nutritional compounds in comparison to well established requirements for drug trials. Although the required quality of the study design, rationale and statistical analysis remains the same, the studies designed to show reduction of cognitive decline require a long duration and the objectives of this task force was to determine best design for these trials. Two specific needs were identified to support trials of nutritional interventions: 1- Risk-reduction strategies are needed to tackle the growing burden of cognitive decline that may lead to dementia, 2- Innovative study designs are needed to improve the quality of these studies.

Key words

Cognitive decline aging design nutritional intervention trials efficacy claims 

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Copyright information

© Serdi and Springer-Verlag France 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Ferry
    • 1
    • 19
  • N. Coley
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. Andrieu
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • C. Bonhomme
    • 6
  • J. P. Caubere
    • 7
  • M. Cesari
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • J. Gautry
    • 8
  • I. Garcia Sanchez
    • 9
  • L. Hugonot
    • 10
  • L. Mansuy
    • 7
  • M. Pahor
    • 11
  • J. Pariente
    • 12
  • P. Ritz
    • 13
  • A. Salva
    • 14
  • J. Sijben
    • 15
  • R. Wieggers
    • 15
  • P. Ythier-Moury
    • 16
  • M. Zaim
    • 17
  • J. Zetlaoui
    • 18
  • B. Vellas
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Nutritional Epidemiology UnitU557 INSERM/U1125 Inra/Cnam/University Paris 13ParisFrance
  2. 2.INSERM U1027ToulouseFrance
  3. 3.University of Toulouse IIIToulouseFrance
  4. 4.GérontopôleToulouse University HospitalToulouseFrance
  5. 5.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthToulouseFrance
  6. 6.Lactalis Nutrition SantéTorcéFrance
  7. 7.Pierre FabreCastresFrance
  8. 8.Nestlé Clinical NutritionMarne la ValléeFrance
  9. 9.DG SancoBrusselsBelgium
  10. 10.MedFormaParisFrance
  11. 11.University of FlorideGainesvilleUSA
  12. 12.Department of NeurologyPurpan HospitalToulouseFrance
  13. 13.Nutrition UnitToulouse University HospitalToulouseFrance
  14. 14.Institut Català de l’EnvellimentUniversita Autonoma de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  15. 15.Nutricia Advanced Medical Nutrition, Danone ResearchCentre for Specialized NutritionWageningenThe Netherlands
  16. 16.Sanofi R&D — TSU AgingMontpellierFrance
  17. 17.Institut de Recherche Pierre FabreToulouseFrance
  18. 18.Nestlé Health Science SAVeveySwitzerland
  19. 19.Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Human Nutrition Research Center of Ile de FranceUFR SMBH Paris 13Bobigny cedexFrance

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