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Evolution of Aβ42 and Aβ40 levels and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio in plasma during progression of Alzheimer’s disease: A multicenter assessment

  • K. Blennow
  • G. De Meyer
  • O. Hansson
  • L. Minthon
  • A. Wallin
  • H. Zetterberg
  • P. Lewczuk
  • H. Vanderstichele
  • E. Vanmechelen
  • J. Kornhuber
  • J. Wiltfang
  • Knd-Study Group
JNHA: Clinical Trials and Aging

Abstract

Objective

To better understand the seemingly contradictory plasma β-amyloid (Aβ) results in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients by using a newly developed plasma Aβ assay, the INNO-BIA plasma Aβ forms, in a multicenter study.

Methods

A combined retrospective analysis of plasma Aβ isoforms on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from three large cross-sectional studies involving 643 samples from the participating German and Swedish centers.

Results

Detection modules based on two different amino (N)-terminal specific Aβ monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that Aβ in plasma could be reliable quantified using a sandwich immunoassay technology with high precision, even for low Aβ42 plasma concentrations. Aβ40 and Aβ42 concentrations varied consistently with the ApoE genotype, while the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio did not. Irrespective of the decrease of the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio with age and MMSE, this parameter was strongly associated with AD, as defined in this study by elevated hyperphosphorylated (P-tau181P) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

Conclusion

A highly robust assay for repeatedly measuring Aβ forms in plasma such as INNO-BIA plasma Aβ forms might be a useful tool in a future risk assessment of AD.

Keywords

Mild Cognitive Impairment ApoE Genotype Mild Cognitive Impairment Patient Neurobiol Aging Medial Temporal Lobe Atrophy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Serdi and Springer Verlag France 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Blennow
    • 1
  • G. De Meyer
    • 2
  • O. Hansson
    • 3
    • 4
  • L. Minthon
    • 3
    • 4
  • A. Wallin
    • 1
  • H. Zetterberg
    • 1
  • P. Lewczuk
    • 5
  • H. Vanderstichele
    • 2
  • E. Vanmechelen
    • 2
  • J. Kornhuber
    • 5
  • J. Wiltfang
    • 6
  • Knd-Study Group
  1. 1.Sahlgrenska University HospitalGöteborg UniversityGöteborgSweden
  2. 2.InnogeneticsGentBelgium
  3. 3.Department of Clinical SciencesClinical Memory Research UnitMalmöSweden
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryLund UniversityLundSweden
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryUniversity Hospital ErlangenErlangenGermany
  6. 6.Kliniken/Institut der Universität Duisburg-EssenEssenGermany

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