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Ocean Science Journal

, Volume 53, Issue 4, pp 611–619 | Cite as

Optimization of Chemical Oxygen Demand Determination in Seawater Samples Using the Alkaline Potassium Permanganate Method

  • TaeKeun Rho
  • Sang-Hwa Choi
  • Eun Soo Kim
  • Na Yeon Kang
  • Sung Rok Cho
  • Sung Hyun Khang
  • Dong-Jin Kang
Article
  • 30 Downloads

Abstract

Chemical oxygen demand (COD) is a practical parameter that is used to estimate the amount of organic pollutants in aqueous systems. It is generally used as a guideline to control the quality of waste treatment effluent globally and is a management tool to evaluate the total pollution load in the highly developed coastal regions of Korea. It is a preferred method because of the speed and simplicity of the analysis and because there are fewer instrumentation requirements. The Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries (MOF) of the Republic of Korea developed a standard procedure for the measurement of COD. It has been revised several times, and the most recent revision was made in 2013 (MOF 2013–230). In this study, we modified the standard COD measurement procedure (MOF 2013–230), especially the sample digestion apparatus, to enhance analytical efficiency for a large sample number (batch), which is called a Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) modified MOF 2013–230. We examined uncertainty related to each experimental step and optimized laboratory conditions to reduce such uncertainties. The detection limit and estimated expanded uncertainty related to the KIOST modified MOF 2013–230 was 0.18 and 0.11 mg O2/L at a 95% confidence level (k = 2), respectively. This study also provides several tips to maintain consistent COD measurements in seawater using the alkaline potassium permanganate method.

Keywords

chemical oxygen demand KIOST modified MOF 2013–230 COD detection limit COD uncertainty alkaline potassium permanganate method 

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Copyright information

© Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST) and the Korean Society of Oceanography (KSO) and Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • TaeKeun Rho
    • 1
  • Sang-Hwa Choi
    • 2
  • Eun Soo Kim
    • 2
  • Na Yeon Kang
    • 2
  • Sung Rok Cho
    • 3
  • Sung Hyun Khang
    • 2
  • Dong-Jin Kang
    • 2
  1. 1.Instrumental Development and Management CenterKIOSTBusanKorea
  2. 2.Marine Environmental Research CenterKIOSTBusanKorea
  3. 3.Risk Assessment Research CenterKIOSTBusanKorea

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