Ocean Science Journal

, Volume 45, Issue 3, pp 159–170 | Cite as

Satellite-derived SST validation based on in-situ data during summer in the East China Sea and western North Pacific

  • Eun Jin Kim
  • Sok Kuh Kang
  • Sung-Tae Jang
  • Jae Hak Lee
  • Young Ho Kim
  • Hyoun-Woo Kang
  • Yeong Yeon Kwon
  • Young Ho Seung
Article

Abstract

Satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) is validated based on in-situ data from the East China Sea (ECS) and western North Pacific where most typhoons, which make landfall on the Korean peninsula, are formed and pass. While forecasting typhoons in terms of intensity and track, coupled ocean-typhoon models are significantly influenced by initial ocean condition. Potentially, satellite-derived SST is a very useful dataset to obtain initial ocean field because of its wide spatial coverage and high temporal resolution. In this study, satellite-derived SST from various sources such as Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TMI), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) and New Generation Sea Surface Temperature for Open Ocean (NGSST-O) datasets from merged SSTs were compared with in-situ observation data using an indirect method which is using near surface temperature for validation of satellite derived SST. In-situ observation data included shipboard measurements such as Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), and Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD), and Argo buoy data. This study shows that in-situ data can be used for microwave derived SST validation because homogeneous features of seawater prevail at water depths of 2 m to 10 m under favorable wind conditions during the summer season in the East China Sea. As a result of validation, root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) are shown to be 0.55 °C between microwave SST and XBT/CTD data mostly under weak wind conditions, and 0.7 °C between XBT/CTD measurement and NGSST-O data. Microwave SST RMSE of 0.55 °C is a potentially valuable data source for general application. Change of SST before and after typhoon passing may imply strength of ocean mixing due to upwelling and turbulent mixing driven by the typhoon. Based on SST change, ocean mixing, driven by Typhoon Nari, was examined. Satellite-derived SST reveals a significant SST drop around the track immediately following the passing of Typhoon Nari in October, 2007.

Key words

Sea Surface Temperature (SST) validation of SST microwave satellite SST TMI AMSR-E NGSST-O and typhoon Nari 

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Copyright information

© Korea Ocean Research & Development Institute (KORDI) and the Korean Society of Oceanography (KSO) and Springer Netherlands 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eun Jin Kim
    • 1
  • Sok Kuh Kang
    • 1
  • Sung-Tae Jang
    • 1
  • Jae Hak Lee
    • 1
  • Young Ho Kim
    • 1
  • Hyoun-Woo Kang
    • 1
  • Yeong Yeon Kwon
    • 2
  • Young Ho Seung
    • 2
  1. 1.Climate Change and Coastal Disaster Research DepartmentKORDISeoulKorea
  2. 2.Department of Oceanography, College of Natural SciencesInha UniversityIncheonKorea

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