Journal of Biorheology

, Volume 26, Issue 1–2, pp 29–37

Load-dispersing design with twined-spring geometry of a distensible intracranial stent for cerebral aneurysms

  • Yasuhiro Shobayashi
  • Satoshi Tateshima
  • Kazuo Tanishita
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12573-011-0044-1

Cite this article as:
Shobayashi, Y., Tateshima, S. & Tanishita, K. J Biorheol (2013) 26: 29. doi:10.1007/s12573-011-0044-1
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Abstract

Endovascular stents are increasingly being used to treat cerebral aneurysms. Mechanically, a cerebrovascular stent must have a low radial stiffness to prevent vessel dissection and rupture. To minimize these complications, we need to consider a stent design that has a low radial force and disperses the load within the stented artery. Therefore, highly distensible, load-dispersion stent designs are desirable for intracranial stenting. This study focused on closed-cell stent geometries and calculated the differences in stress within the artery because of the structure by using finite-element modeling. The results showed that the design with hexagonal cell geometry stretched in the circumferential direction had lower radial and circumferential stresses than did the other models. Comparing the maximum radial stress of our models, stress reduction of 35% was obtained with this design. Moreover, its radial stress was 47 kPa, which was similar to the critical stress of 42 kPa assumed in this study. This stent model was characterized by narrow strut spacing and a large surface area, which was dominated by the twined-spring geometry. It had low radial and circumferential stresses and a dispersed stress distribution compared with the other models. Therefore, this design is a desirable load-dispersing design for cerebrovascular treatment.

Keywords

Cerebral aneurysm Stent–vessel interactions Stent Flexibility Radial stiffness 

Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Biorheology 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuhiro Shobayashi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Satoshi Tateshima
    • 2
  • Kazuo Tanishita
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Integrated Design Engineering, Graduate School of Keio UniversityKeio UniversityYokohamaJapan
  2. 2.Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, David Geffen, School of Medicine at UCLAUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of System Design EngineeringKeio UniversityYokohamaJapan

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