On the mechanics of elastomers undergoing scission and cross-linking

Original Paper

Abstract

The thermo-mechanical response of elastomeric materials is usually represented by the constitutive theory for non-linear thermo-elasticity. Inherent in this theory is the assumption that no change in the macromolecular microstructure occurs during deformation. However, the microstructure can be changed by the scission and cross-linking of macromolecular network junctions. This paper reviews the constitutive theories for deformation and thermally induced scission and cross-linking that have been developed. It then summarizes their use in characterizing the implications of scission and cross-linking for the mechanical response of polymers, such as the alteration of mechanical properties, induced anisotropy, permanent set, residual stresses, loss of monotonicity of constitutive and structural response and evolution of boundary layers of locally high deformation.

Keywords

Elastomers Scission and cross-linking Constitutive equations Permanent set Residual stresses Induced anisotropy Alan Wineman 

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Copyright information

© Indian Institute of Technology Madras 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor, MichiganUSA

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