Food Security

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 311–327

Crop health and its global impacts on the components of food security

  • S. Savary
  • S. Bregaglio
  • L. Willocquet
  • D. Gustafson
  • D. Mason D’Croz
  • A. Sparks
  • N. Castilla
  • A. Djurle
  • C. Allinne
  • Mamta Sharma
  • V. Rossi
  • L. Amorim
  • A. Bergamin
  • J. Yuen
  • P. Esker
  • Neil McRoberts
  • J. Avelino
  • E. Duveiller
  • J. Koo
  • K. Garrett
Original Paper

Abstract

The literature on the importance of plant pathogens sometimes emphasizes their possible role in historical food shortages and even in famines. Aside from such major crises, plant pathogens should also be seen as important reducers of crop performances, with impacts on system sustainability, from the ecological, agronomical, social, and economic standpoints – all contributing ultimately to affecting food security. These views need reconciliation in order to produce a clearer picture of the multidimensional effects of plant disease epidemics. Such a picture is needed for disease management today, but would also be useful for future policies. This article attempts to develop a framework that would enable assessment of the impacts of plant diseases, referred collectively to as crop health, on food security via its components. We have combined three different existing definitions of food security in order to develop a framework consisting of the following six components: (1) Availability. Primary production; (2) Availability. Import - Stockpiles; (3) Access. Physical and supply chain; (4) Access. Economic; (5) Stability of food availability; (6) Utility-Safety-Quality-Nutritive value. In this framework, components of food security are combined with three attributes of production situations: the nature of the considered crop (i.e. food- or non-food), the structure of farms (i.e. subsistence or commercial), and the structure of markets (i.e. weakly organized and local, to strongly organized and globalized). The resulting matrix: [Food security components] × [Attributes of production situations] provides a framework where the impacts of chronic, acute, and emerging plant disease epidemics on food security can be examined. We propose that, given the number of components and interactions at play, a systems modelling approach is required to address the functioning of food systems exposed to plant disease risks. This approach would have application in both the management of the current attrition of crop performances by plant diseases, and also of possible disease-induced shocks. Such an approach would also enable quantifying shifts in disease vulnerability of production situations, and therefore, of food systems, as a result of climate change, globalization, and evolving crop health.

Keywords

Plant disease epidemics Epidemiology Crop losses Chronic epidemics Acute epidemics Emerging epidemics 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and International Society for Plant Pathology 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Savary
    • 1
  • S. Bregaglio
    • 2
  • L. Willocquet
    • 1
  • D. Gustafson
    • 3
  • D. Mason D’Croz
    • 4
  • A. Sparks
    • 5
  • N. Castilla
    • 6
  • A. Djurle
    • 7
  • C. Allinne
    • 8
    • 9
  • Mamta Sharma
    • 10
  • V. Rossi
    • 11
  • L. Amorim
    • 12
  • A. Bergamin
    • 12
  • J. Yuen
    • 7
  • P. Esker
    • 13
  • Neil McRoberts
    • 14
  • J. Avelino
    • 9
    • 15
  • E. Duveiller
    • 16
  • J. Koo
    • 4
  • K. Garrett
    • 17
  1. 1.AGIR, INRA, INPT, INP-EI PurpanUniversité de ToulouseCastanet TolosanFrance
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences - Production, Landscape, Agroenergy, Cassandra LaboratoryUniversità degli Studi di MilanoMilanItaly
  3. 3.Center for Integrated Modeling of Sustainable Agriculture and Nutrition Security (CIMSANS)ILSI Research FoundationWashingtonUSA
  4. 4.International Food Policy Research InstituteNW WashingtonUSA
  5. 5.Centre for Crop Health, Institute for Agriculture and the Environment, Research and Innovation DivisionUniversity of Southern QueenslandToowoombaAustralia
  6. 6.Plant Breeding, Genetics and BiotechnologyInternational Rice Research InstituteLos BañosPhilippines
  7. 7.Department of Forest Mycology and Plant PathologySwedish University of Agricultural SciencesUppsalaSweden
  8. 8.CIRAD/CATIE - CIRAD/UMR SystemSupAgroMontpellierFrance
  9. 9.CATIE, DIDTurrialbaCosta Rica
  10. 10.Legumes PathologyInternational Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)PatancheruIndia
  11. 11.Department of Sustainable Crop Production - DI.PRO.VE.S., Facoltà di Scienze agrarie, alimentari e ambientaliUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuorePiacenzaItaly
  12. 12.Department of Plant PathologyUniversidade de São PauloPiracicabaBrazil
  13. 13.Centro para Investigaciones en Granos y SemillasUniversidad de Costa RicaSan JoséCosta Rica
  14. 14.Plant Pathology DepartmentUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  15. 15.CIRAD, UR106 Bioagresseurs: Analyse et maîtrise du risqueMontpellier Cedex 5France
  16. 16.AfricaRiceAbidjanCôte d’Ivoire
  17. 17.Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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