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Food Security

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 591–595 | Cite as

Analysis of urban consumers’ willingness to pay a premium for African Leafy Vegetables (ALVs) in Kenya: a case of Eldoret Town

  • P. K. Chelang’aEmail author
  • G. A. Obare
  • S. C. Kimenju
Case Study

Abstract

This study surveyed urban consumers in Eldoret Town, Kenya to determine the willingness to pay (WTP) a premium for African leafy vegetables (ALVs) and the underlying determinants using the semi-double bounded contingent valuation choice and logit models, respectively. Consumers generally preferred ALVs to exotic leafy vegetables and were willing to pay an average premium of 79 % for them: 88 % and 70 % in open air and supermarkets, respectively. The WTP premium was positively influenced by age, presence of children in the household, years of schooling of the household decision maker and the number of years the consumers had been consuming ALVs. Implications for policy are drawn.

Keywords

African leafy vegetables Consumers’ willingness to pay Semi-double bounded contingent valuation Open air markets Supermarkets Kenya 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We acknowledge the financial support for the study by the African Economic Research Consortium (AERC), which was part of the Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics (CMAAE). We are responsible for any errors of omission or commission.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and International Society for Plant Pathology 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. K. Chelang’a
    • 1
    Email author
  • G. A. Obare
    • 1
  • S. C. Kimenju
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural Economics and Business ManagementEgerton UniversityEgertonKenya
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural DevelopmentGeorg-August-University of GöttingenGöttingenGermany

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