Food Security

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 371–386 | Cite as

Plant health clinics in Bolivia 2000—2009: operations and preliminary results

  • Jeffery W. Bentley
  • Eric Boa
  • Solveig Danielsen
  • Pablo Franco
  • Olivia Antezana
  • Bertho Villarroel
  • Henry Rodríguez
  • Jhon Ferrrufino
  • Javier Franco
  • René Pereira
  • Jaime Herbas
  • Oscar Díaz
  • Vladimir Lino
  • Juan Villarroel
  • Fredy Almendras
  • Saúl Colque
Original Paper

Abstract

Smallholder farmers need information on plant diseases. Ten plant health clinics (Postas para Plantas) evolved in Bolivia after 2000 and are still operating due to the efforts of three local institutions. The plant clinics receive any problem, on any crop, and give written and verbal recommendations, immediately if possible. Many clinics are held at weekly farm fairs, where villagers from many surrounding communities can seek help. The clinic staff write fact sheets for farmers on common problems. From 2000 to early 2009 the clinics received more than 9000 queries on over 100 crops with potato comprising two thirds of the queries, followed by peach, tomato and broad bean. Potato tuber moth and potato weevil were by far the most dominant plant health problems in the high Andes, but not in lowland areas. The diversity of crops and problems are a big challenge to the clinic staff. With basic training and practical experience they learn to diagnose most problems. However, they need access to expert support to solve some of the more difficult problems and improve the quality of advice. Preliminary results show cases of poverty alleviation, reduction in pesticide abuse, increased harvests and other benefits. The plant health clinics in Bolivia enabled extension and research to reach more farmers with a timely low-cost service.

Keywords

Plant health clinics Bolivia National plant healthcare systems Research/extension links Global plant clinic 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. & International Society for Plant Pathology 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffery W. Bentley
    • 1
  • Eric Boa
    • 2
  • Solveig Danielsen
    • 3
  • Pablo Franco
    • 4
  • Olivia Antezana
    • 4
  • Bertho Villarroel
    • 4
  • Henry Rodríguez
    • 4
  • Jhon Ferrrufino
    • 4
  • Javier Franco
    • 5
  • René Pereira
    • 5
  • Jaime Herbas
    • 5
  • Oscar Díaz
    • 5
  • Vladimir Lino
    • 5
  • Juan Villarroel
    • 6
  • Fredy Almendras
    • 6
  • Saúl Colque
    • 6
  1. 1.Global Plant ClinicCochabambaBolivia
  2. 2.Global Plant ClinicCABIEgham, SurreyUK
  3. 3.Centre for Health Research and Development, Faculty of Life SciencesUniversity of CopenhagenFrederiksberg CDenmark
  4. 4.CIATSanta CruzBolivia
  5. 5.Fundación ProinpaCochabambaBolivia
  6. 6.Facultad de Ciencias Agrícolas, Pecuarias, Forestales y Veterinarias, Universidad Mayor de San SimónCochabambaBolivia

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