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Anatomical Science International

, Volume 93, Issue 4, pp 464–468 | Cite as

Anatomical variations of the torcular Herophili: macroscopic study and clinical aspects

  • Wakoto MatsudaEmail author
  • Takahiro Sonomura
  • Satoru Honma
  • Sachi Ohno
  • Tetsuya Goto
  • Shuichi Hirai
  • Masahiro Itoh
  • Yoshiko Honda
  • Hiroki Fujieda
  • Jun Udagawa
  • Shingo Takano
  • Fumino Fujiyama
  • Shuichi Ueda
Original Article

Abstract

The anatomical variations of the confluence of sinuses were examined, focusing on the continuity of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and the transverse sinuses (TSs). In the 142 specimens studied, there were 72 symmetric cases (50.7%) and 70 asymmetric cases (49.3%). The symmetric group (no dominant type) was categorized into 34 cases of bifurcation (23.9%) and 38 cases of confluence (26.8%). The asymmetric group was categorized into 54 cases of the right-dominant type (38.0%) and 16 cases of the left-dominant type (11.3%). The right-dominant type was further categorized into 38 partially-communicating (26.8%) and 16 non-communicating types (11.3%). The left-dominant type was categorized into 11 partially-communicating (7.7%) and 5 non-communicating types (3.5%). In summary, the SSS asymmetrically drained into one TS in about half of the cases studied. The right-dominant type was about three to four times as common as the left-dominant type. The draining pattern shown by the asymmetric group could provoke intracranial hypertension due to unilateral jugular vein obstruction. In order to avoid this risk in cases of neck dissection, jugular vein catheterization, or hypercoagulopathy, preoperative evaluations of the dural sinus variations via MR venography, three-dimensional CT, or plain X-ray of the skull are recommended.

Keywords

Confluence of sinuses Dural sinus Superior sagittal sinus Transverse sinus Torcular Herophili 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) 15K10360 and (C) 17K01481, Grants-in-Aid from The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) for Scientific Research (25282247 and 15K12770), and a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (“Adaptive Circuit Shift;” 26112001). We would like to express our thanks to R. Tsujishima, Y. Banno, and H. Kito for their dedicated technical support in relation to this study.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors hereby declare that there are no conflicts of interest relating to this study.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Anatomists 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wakoto Matsuda
    • 1
    Email author
  • Takahiro Sonomura
    • 2
  • Satoru Honma
    • 3
  • Sachi Ohno
    • 4
    • 10
  • Tetsuya Goto
    • 4
  • Shuichi Hirai
    • 5
    • 11
  • Masahiro Itoh
    • 5
  • Yoshiko Honda
    • 6
  • Hiroki Fujieda
    • 6
  • Jun Udagawa
    • 7
  • Shingo Takano
    • 8
  • Fumino Fujiyama
    • 9
  • Shuichi Ueda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Histology and NeurobiologyDokkyo Medical University School of MedicineMibu-machi, Shimotsuga-gunJapan
  2. 2.Department of Oral AnatomyAsahi University School of DentistryMizuhoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy IIKanazawa Medical UniversityUchinada-machi, Kahoku-gunJapan
  4. 4.Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental SciencesKagoshima UniversityKagoshimaJapan
  5. 5.Department of AnatomyTokyo Medical UniversityShinjuku-kuJapan
  6. 6.Department of Anatomy, School of MedicineTokyo Women’s Medical UniversityShinjuku-kuJapan
  7. 7.Division of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Department of AnatomyShiga University of Medical ScienceOtsuJapan
  8. 8.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity of Tsukuba HospitalTsukubaJapan
  9. 9.Laboratory of Neural Circuitry, Graduate School of Brain ScienceDoshisha UniversityKyotanabeJapan
  10. 10.Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental SciencesKagoshima UniversityKagoshimaJapan
  11. 11.Department of AnatomyAichi Medical UniversityNagakuteJapan

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