Advertisement

Asia Pacific Education Review

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 573–586 | Cite as

Response of educational research in Turkey to the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development

  • Mustafa Öztürk
Article

Abstract

With the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD), nations’ engagement with sustainability has differed considerably on the basis of their socio-political priorities. Since reviewing research trends is one way of getting a broad understanding about the value attached to an internationally prioritized issue, such as Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), this study aims to see the coherence and effectiveness of the DESD on the Turkish stakeholders’ side and portrays how such a global issue is addressed in educational research by local actors. The study employed a mixed-method design through a two-step process: a quantitative investigation through numbers to assess the level and direction of the attention paid to ESD; and a qualitative examination through content and collocation analyses to identify key dimensions and prevalent themes. As the sample, the papers published with a focus on ESD themes between the years 2005 and 2014 in three high-impact educational journals in Turkey were included. The data analyses were carried out through: (a) descriptive statistics by use of frequency distribution tables and percentages; (b) a content analysis employed with thematic coding and categorization and (c) a collocation analysis done by means of the software AntConc. The most prevailing themes emerging from the publications were on environmentalism; human values; gender equality; democratic values; multiculturalism; interculturality; morals and character education; student dropouts and absenteeism; life-long learning; community service and responsibility; human rights; children’s rights; citizenship and peace education. All those themes gave crucial hints about the local concerns and socio-cultural priorities of the case of Turkey.

Keywords

Sustainable development ESD Educational research DESD Turkey 

References

  1. Agyeman, J. (2008). Toward a “just” sustainability? Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, 22(6), 751–756.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Aighewi, I. T., & Osaigbovo, U. A. (2010). Students’ perspectives on worldwide ‘greening’ of tertiary education curricula. Research in Science Education, 40(5), 625–637.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Azapagic, A., Perdan, S., & Shallcross, D. (2005). How much do engineering students know about sustainable development? The findings of an international survey and possible implications for the engineering curriculum. European Journal of Engineering Education, 30(1), 1–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bhatti, M., & Dixon, A. (2003). Special focus: Housing, environment and sustainability. Housing Studies, 18(4), 501–504.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Booth, C. (2009). A motivational turn for environmental ethics. Ethics and Environment, 14(1), 1–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bostrom, M. (2012). A missing pillar? Challenges in theorizing and practicing social sustainability: Introduction to the special issue. Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, 8(1), 3–14.Google Scholar
  7. Carson, R. (1962). Silent spring. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
  8. Crabtree, L. (2005). Sustainable housing development in urban Australia: Exploring obstacles to and opportunities for eco-city efforts. Australian Geographer, 36(3), 333–350.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Cuthill, M. (2009). Strengthening the “social” in sustainable development: Developing a conceptual framework for social sustainability in a rapid urban growth region in Australia. Sustainable Development, 18(6), 362–373.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Dillard, J., Dujon, V., & King, M. C. (Eds.). (2009). Understanding the social dimension of sustainability. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  11. IISD [The International Institute for Sustainable Development]. (2012). Sustainable timeline. Winnipeg: IISD. Retrieved January 15, 2015, from http://www.iisd.org.
  12. Jucker, R. (2002). Sustainability? Never heard of it? Some basics we shouldn’t ignore when engaging in education for sustainability. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 3(1), 8–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Kagawa, F. (2007). Dissonance in students’ perceptions of sustainable development and sustainability. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 8(3), 317–338.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Klosterman, M., Sadler, T., & Brown, J. (2012). Science teachers use of mass media to address socio-scientific and sustainability issues. Research in Science Education, 42(1), 51–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Kollmuss, A., & Agyeman, J. (2002). Mind the gap: Why do people act environmentally and what are the barriers to pro-environmental behaviour? Environmental Education Research, 8(3), 239–260.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Kopnina, H., & Meijers, F. (2014). Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 15(2), 188–207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Leal Filho, W., Manolas, E., & Pace, P. (2009). Education for Sustainable Development: Current discourses and practices and their relevance to technology education. International Journal of Technology Design Education, 19, 149–165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Leal Filho, W., Manolas, E., & Pace, P. (2015). The future we want: Key issues on sustainable development in higher education after Rio and the UN decade of Education for Sustainable Development. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 16(1), 112–129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Leiserowitz, A. A., Kates, R. W., & Parris, T. M. (2004). Sustainability values, attitudes, and behaviours: A review of multi-national and global trends. CID Working Paper No. 113. Cambridge, MA: Science, Environment and Development Group, Centre for International Development, Harvard University.Google Scholar
  20. Lundmarck, C. (2007). The new ecological paradigm revisited: Anchoring the NEP scale in environmental ethics. Environmental Education Research, 13(3), 329–347.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Murphy, K. (2012). The social pillar of sustainable development: A literature review and framework for policy analysis. Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, 8(1), 15–29.Google Scholar
  22. OECD [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2008). Promoting sustainable consumption: Good practices in OECD countries. Danvers, MA: OECD.Google Scholar
  23. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018a). Air and GHG emissions (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/93d10cf7-en.
  24. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018b). Forest resources (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/2546ca0a-en.
  25. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018c). GDP per hour worked (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/1439e590-en.
  26. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018d). Income inequality (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/459aa7f1-en.
  27. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018e). Population with tertiary education (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/0b8f90e9-en.
  28. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018f). Poverty rate (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/0fe1315d-en.
  29. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018g). Social institutions and gender (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/7b6cfcf0-en.
  30. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018h). Social spending (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/7497563b-en.
  31. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018i). Violence against women (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/f1eb4876-en.
  32. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018j). Water withdrawals (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/17729979-en.
  33. OECD [Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development]. (2018k). Youth not in employment, education or training (NEET) (indicator).  https://doi.org/10.1787/72d1033a-en.
  34. RTMD [Republic of Turkey, Ministry of Development]. (2012). Turkey’s sustainable development report: Claiming the future. Ankara: Ministry of Development.Google Scholar
  35. RTMD [Republic of Turkey, Ministry of Development]. (2016). Report on Turkey’s initial steps towards the implementation of the 2030 agenda for sustainable development. Ankara: Ministry of Development.Google Scholar
  36. Stables, A., & Scott, W. (2002). The quest for holism in Education for Sustainable Development. Environmental Education Research, 8(1), 53–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Sterling, S. (2001). Sustainable education: Re-visioning learning and change. Devon: Green Books.Google Scholar
  38. Stern, P. C. (2000). Toward a coherent theory of environmentally significant behaviour. Journal of Social Issues, 56(3), 407–424.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Stevenson, R. (2006). Tensions and transitions in policy discourse: Re-contextualising a de-contextualised EE/ESD debate. Environmental Education Research, 12(3/4), 277–290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Summers, M., Corney, G., & Ghilds, A. (2004). Student teachers’ conceptions of sustainable development: The starting points of geographers and scientists. Educational Research, 46(2), 163–182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Terry, A., Hill, J., & Woodland, W. (2006). Uniting national aspirations and local implementation in sustainable development: A introduction. In J. Hill, A. Terry & W. Woodland (Eds.), Sustainable development: National aspirations, local implementation (pp. 1–13). Aldershot: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  42. UN [United Nations]. (1972). Declaration of the United Nations conference on the human environment. Retrieved February 1, 2015, from http://www.unep.org/documents.multilingual/default.asp?documentid=97&articleid=1503.
  43. UN [United Nations]. (1992). Report of the United Nations conference on environment and development. Retrieved February 1, 2015, from http://www.un.org/documents/ga/conf151/aconf15126-3.htm.
  44. UN [United Nations]. (2000). United Nations Millennium Declaration. Retrieved February 1, 2015, from http://www.un.org/millennium/declaration/ares552e.htm.
  45. UN [United Nations]. (2002). United Nations Decade of Education and Sustainable Development. Retrieved February 1, 2015, from http://www.un-documents.net/a57r254.htm.
  46. UN [United Nations]. (2015). Transforming our world: The 2030 agenda for sustainable development. Retrieved January 6, 2016, from https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015.
  47. UNESCO [United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization]. (1978). Intergovernmental conference on environmental education final report. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  48. UNESCO [United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization]. (2005a). United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005–2014): International implementation scheme - Draft. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  49. UNESCO [United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization]. (2005b). United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005–2014): International implementation scheme. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  50. UNESCO [United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization]. (2005c). United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005–2014): Guidelines and recommendations for reorienting teacher education to address sustainability. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  51. UNESCO [United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization]. (2007). The UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD 2005–2014): The first two years. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  52. UNESCO [United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization]. (2012). Education for Sustainable Development sourcebook. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  53. Vallance, S., Perkins, H. C., & Dixon, J. E. (2011). What is social sustainability? A clarification of concepts. Geoforum, 42, 342–348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Vavik, T., & Keitsch, M. (2010). Exploring relationships between universal design and social sustainable development: Some methodological aspects to the debate on the sciences of sustainability. Sustainable Development, 18(5), 295–305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Wals, A. E. J. (2009). A Mid-DESD review: Key findings and ways forward. Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, (3)2, 195–204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. WCED. (1987). Our common future: The World Commission on Environment and Development’s report. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  57. Zeegers, Y., & Clark, I. F. (2014). Students’ perceptions of Education for Sustainable Development. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 15(2), 242–253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hacettepe University School of Foreign LanguagesAnkaraTurkey

Personalised recommendations