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A comparative study of international branch campuses in Malaysia, Singapore, China, and South Korea: regulation, governance, and quality assurance

  • Angela Yung-Chi Hou
  • Christopher Hill
  • Karen Hui Jung Chen
  • Sandy Tsai
Article

Abstract

Malaysia, Singapore, China, and South Korea employed branch campuses as a means to develop and promote economic growth and global competitiveness. The aim of this study was to explore national policies and regulatory frameworks for international branch campuses in the four key nations identified above. The development of internal quality assurance mechanisms and external review approaches in international branch campuses were investigated, via in-depth interview and document analysis. The study presented three major findings. First, an inclusive model of internal quality has been developed in international branch campuses found in the four nations. Second, the international branch campuses’ external quality assurance approaches, in the four countries, were diverse and included exemption, reliance on home country accreditation, duplication, and international accreditation. Third, South Korea and Singapore were more closely aligned to liberal regulation with minimal quality assurance, whereas Malaysia and China were in the category of liberal regulation and restrict regulation, respectively, but with comprehensive quality assurance process.

Keywords

International branch campus Quality assurance Regulation Governance 

Notes

Funding

The funding was provided by Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan (Grant No. MOST 103-2410-H-030-052).

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Copyright information

© Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EducationNational Chengchi UniversityTaipei CityTaiwan, ROC
  2. 2.Faculty of EducationThe British University in DubaiDubaiUAE
  3. 3.National Taipei University of EducationTaipei CityTaiwan, ROC
  4. 4.National Chengchi UniversityTaipei CityTaiwan, ROC

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