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Asia Pacific Education Review

, Volume 16, Issue 1, pp 79–93 | Cite as

The effect of educational leadership on students’ achievement: a meta-analysis study

  • Engin Karadağ
  • Fatih Bektaş
  • Nazım Çoğaltay
  • Mikail Yalçın
Article

Abstract

In this meta-analysis study, different leadership styles were combined, and the relationship between educational leadership and student achievement was analyzed. In the literature review, 57 research articles/dissertations, independent from one another, were brought together, and 28,964 study subjects were included in the sample group. The results of the analyses performed with a random effects model revealed that educational leadership has a medium effect on students’ achievement. As was expected, the most comprehensive effect among leadership styles was found in distributive and transformational leadership. Considering the effect of educational leadership on students’ achievement, it is recommended to examine the effect of leadership on other components of school and shareholders in future studies.

Keywords

Leadership Educational leadership Achievement Meta-analysis 

References

Note: References marked with an asterisk indicate studies included in the meta-analysis

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Copyright information

© Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Engin Karadağ
    • 1
  • Fatih Bektaş
    • 1
  • Nazım Çoğaltay
    • 2
  • Mikail Yalçın
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of Eskişehir OsmangaziMeselik, EskisehirTurkey
  2. 2.Faculty of EducationUniversity of Muş AlparslanMuşTurkey

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