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Asia Pacific Education Review

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 11–22 | Cite as

The quest for an entrepreneurial university in East Asia: impact on academics and administrators in higher education

  • Ka Ho Mok
Article

Abstract

In the last decade, universities in East Asia have taken knowledge transfer more seriously, especially when the state funding for higher education was reduced while other private funding sources were diversified. Universities in East Asia collaborate with the industrial and business sectors on projects related to research, development, and knowledge transfer to enhance their global competitiveness. This article examines how the quest for an entrepreneurial university in East Asia has affected academics and administrators in higher education, with particular reference to the perceived impact of an entrepreneurial university on academic life.

Keywords

Entrepreneurial university Academic freedom Managerialism and university governance Global competitiveness 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author would like to thank the Research Grant Committee (RGC) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government for offering research grant support to the project entitled “Fostering Entrepreneurship and Innovation: A Comparative Study of Changing Roles of Universities in East Asia.” The GRF grant was funded by RGC (GRF750210).

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Copyright information

© Education Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Hong Kong Institute of EducationTai PoHong Kong

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