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Fisheries Science

, Volume 85, Issue 6, pp 1077–1087 | Cite as

Annual and seasonal changes in the assemblage of planktonic copepods and appendicularians in Funka Bay before and after intrusion of Coastal Oyashio Water

  • Hideyoshi Yamaoka
  • Tetsuya TakatsuEmail author
  • Kota Suzuki
  • Naoto Kobayashi
  • Atsushi Ooki
  • Mitsuhiro Nakaya
Original Article Environment

Abstract

Annual and seasonal changes in the abundance and the assemblage of planktonic copepods and appendicularians were clarified in Funka Bay. Zooplankton samples were obtained by vertical hauls with a NORPAC net (0.10-mm mesh aperture) from December to May over a 4-year period (2014–2017). Temporal fluctuations of mean abundance of copepods were small from December 2013 to May 2014 under the low water temperature condition (maximum 1.55 times difference between adjacent survey periods), while those were large in other 3 years (1.60–1.93 times). Maximum mean abundance of appendicularians in 2014 (6.0 × 104 ind./m2) was lower than those in 2015–2017 (8.6 × 104–1.4 × 105 ind./m2). Less saline (≤ 33.3) and cold Coastal Oyashio Water (COW) intruded in early February 2014, late February 2015, and late March 2016 and 2017. Phytoplankton blooms occurred in March of all 4 years. Copepods and appendicularians increased nearer periods of phytoplankton bloom than after COW intrusion. In the results of canonical correspondence analysis, the assemblage of copepods and appendicularians gradually changed from small-sized and warm-water species to large-sized and cold-water ones. Northwesterly wind speed had an effect equal to COW intrusion (82% of COW intrusion) to the change in taxonomic compositions of copepods and appendicularians.

Keywords

Funka Bay Coastal Oyashio Water Wind-induced current Copepoda Appendicularia Canonical correspondence analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Dr. Toshikuni Nakatani and Captain Yoshihiko Kamei and crew of the T/S Ushio-maru, and staff of the Laboratory of Marine Bioresource Science of Hokkaido University for their cooperation in collecting samples. This study was supported by Hokusui Society Foundation, Sapporo, and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 25450269, 16K07834.

Supplementary material

12562_2019_1345_MOESM1_ESM.docx (48 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 47 kb)

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Fisheries Science 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Fisheries SciencesHokkaido UniversityHakodateJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Fisheries SciencesHokkaido UniversityHakodateJapan
  3. 3.Training Ship Ushio-maru, Faculty of FisheriesHokkaido UniversityHakodateJapan
  4. 4.Kyoto Marine High SchoolMiyazuJapan
  5. 5.Chiba Prefectural Fisheries Research CenterMinamibosoJapan

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