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The leader-follower formation control of nonholonomic mobile robots

  • Yanyan Dai
  • Suk-Gyu Lee
Regular Paper Robotics and Automation

Abstract

In this paper, the leader-waypoint-follower formation is constructed based on relative motion states of nonholonomic mobile robots. Since the robots’ velocities are constrained, we proposed a geometrical waypoint in cone method so that the follower robots move to their desired waypoints effectively. In order to form and maintain the formation of multi-robots, we combine stable tracking control method with receding horizon (RH) tracking control method. The stable tracking control method aims to make the robot’s state errors stable and the RH tracking control method guarantees that the convergence of the state errors tends toward zero efficiently. Based on the methods mentioned above, the mobile robots formation can be maintained in any trajectory such as a straight line, a circle or a sinusoid. The simulation results based on the proposed approaches show each follower robot can move to its waypoint efficiently. To validate the proposed methods, we do the experiments with nonholonomic robots using only limited on-board sensor information.

Keywords

Efficiency geometrical waypoint in cone method leader-follower formation stability velocity constraints 

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Copyright information

© Institute of Control, Robotics and Systems and The Korean Institute of Electrical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg  2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Electrical EngineeringYeungnam UniversityGyeongsanKorea

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