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Health and Technology

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 45–55 | Cite as

Wireless power transfer endoscopy capsule – CAP4U

  • Ricardo Puga
  • Mário Dinis
  • Judite FerreiraEmail author
  • Laranja Pontes
  • Emanuel Lomba
Original Paper
  • 44 Downloads

Abstract

Endoscopic capsule is a well-known concept that provides minimal invasive assessment of digestive tract. We describe the work progresses of a capsule - Cap4U – with the size and shape of a common pill and containing a minute camera. The Cap4U is within the novel embedding Wireless Power Transfer System (WPTS). This technology allows the transmission of electrical energy from an external power source, such as the electrical power grid or a consuming device, without the use of electrical conductor wires. Several techniques architecture used to implements the present novel endoscopy system are explained. The specific requirements of image acquisition in one hand and the limitations in the size of the Cap4U in the otherhand, as well as, the energy restriction and the electromagnetic interferences were considered in the present work in all the technical options carried out.

Keywords

Capsule endoscopy Wireless power transmission Technology Energy induction 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© IUPESM and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Instituto Politecnico do Porto Instituto Superior de Engenharia do PortoPortoPortugal
  2. 2.Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do PortoPortoPortugal

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