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Biophysical Reviews

, 1:43 | Cite as

Intercalated discs: multiple proteins perform multiple functions in non-failing and failing human hearts

  • Colleen B. Estigoy
  • Fredrik Pontén
  • Jacob Odeberg
  • Benjamin Herbert
  • Michael Guilhaus
  • Michael Charleston
  • Joshua W. K. Ho
  • Darryl Cameron
  • Cristobal G. dos Remedios
Review

Abstract

The intercalated disc (ICD) occupies a central position in the transmission of force, electrical continuity and chemical communication between cardiomyocytes. Changes in its structure and composition are strongly implicated in heart failure. ICD functions include: maintenance of electrical continuity across the ICD; physical links between membranes and the cytoskeleton; intercellular adhesion; maintenance of ICD structure and function; and growth. About 200 known proteins are associated with ICDs, 40% of which change in disease. We systemically reviewed cardiac immunohistochemical data on the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) web site, ExPASy protein binding data and published papers on ICDs. We identified 43 proteins not previously reported, and confirmed 37 proteins that have previously been described. In addition, 102 proteins not present on the HPA web site but were described in ICDs in the literature. We group these into clusters that demonstrate functionally interactive groups of proteins demonstrating that ICDs play a key role in cardiomyocyte function.

Keywords

Cardiac intercalated disc Functional protein groups Immunohistochemistry Changes in disease Human heart 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This project was supported by a grant from the Australian Research Council FABLS Research Network.

Supplementary material

12551_2008_7_MOESM1_ESM.xls (84 kb)
Table 1 (XLS 84 KB)
12551_2008_7_MOESM2_ESM.doc (33 kb)
Table 1 ESM1 (DOC 33 KB)

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Copyright information

© International Union for Pure and Applied Biophysics (IUPAB) and Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colleen B. Estigoy
    • 1
  • Fredrik Pontén
    • 2
  • Jacob Odeberg
    • 3
  • Benjamin Herbert
    • 4
  • Michael Guilhaus
    • 5
  • Michael Charleston
    • 6
  • Joshua W. K. Ho
    • 1
    • 6
    • 7
  • Darryl Cameron
    • 1
  • Cristobal G. dos Remedios
    • 1
  1. 1.Bosch Institute, Department of Anatomy (F13)The University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Human Proteome Research GroupUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden
  3. 3.Department of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of TechnologyKTH AlbNov University CenterStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Proteomics Technology Centre of ExpertiseUniversity of TechnologyBroadwayAustralia
  5. 5.Biomedical Mass Spectrometry FacilityUniversity of New South WalesKensingtonAustralia
  6. 6.School of Information TechnologyThe University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  7. 7.NICTAAustralian Technology ParkEveleighAustralia

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