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Early Miocene insectivores of Gökler (Kazan Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey)

  • Lars W. van den Hoek OstendeEmail author
  • Peter Joniak
  • Bora Rojay
  • Cathelijn Aten
  • Melike Bilgin
  • Pablo Pelaez-Campomanes
Original Paper
  • 49 Downloads

Abstract

Unlike the rodents of the local zone C (MN 2) fauna of Gökler, the faunal list of the insectivores shows little surprises. The fauna is dominated by the gymnure Galerix saratji and the enigmatic talpid Suleimania ruemkae, both present in such numbers that for the first time the anterior dentition could be reconstructed. In the case of Galerix, these new data show that the older species had a relatively long premolar row and a conspicuously high p2/p3 ratio. Other eulipotyphlans are the moles Theratiskos rutgeri and Desmanodon sp., the dimylid Turkodimylus sp., the heterosoricid Dinosorex anatolicus and the shrews Oligosorex aff. reumeri and Soricid I. Overall, the diversity indicates a humid environment, as is usual for the early Miocene lignite bed faunas of Anatolia. The relatively low number of Theratiskos, shared with other B-C faunas from central Anatolia, suggests a difference between the environments in that region and those further to the south.

Keywords

Eulipotyphla Palaeoenvironments Biostratigraphy Galerix Talpidae 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We warmly thank Marianna Kováčová, I. Mazzini, M. Poljak and other members of the VAMP team for their invaluable help during the field campaigns. We thank all the contributors of the RCMNS workshop ‘Taking the Orient Express’ (Izmir, 16–18 September 2016). Their discussions provided an important source of inspiration for this paper. Delia van Oijen and Rutger van den Hoek Ostende helped with making the SEM photographs and turning them into plates. The comments of Marguerite Hugueney and Johannes Klietmann greatly helped to properly finalize this work.

Funding information

This research was part of the Vertical Anatolian Movements Project (VAMP), funded by the TOPO-EUROPE programme of the European Science Foundation and the Slovak Research and Development Agency (SRDA-project number ESF-EC-009-07 and project APVV-15-0575). PJ was partly supported by the Slovak Scientific Grant Agency (VEGA 1/0702/17). LHO gratefully acknowledges the support of Tübitak under the 2221 programme for visiting scientists and particularly thanks his hosts Serdar Mayda and Tanju Kaya and the staff of the EGE Natural History Museum for the warm reception during his stay. MB was supported by EGE University (TTM/001/2016, TTM/002/2016) and the Slovak Scientific Grant Agency (VEGA 1/0164/19). EGE University also provided short-term research grants for LHO, PJ and PPC, facilitating the international cooperation on the history of Anatolia. This paper is a contribution to NECLIME.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Naturalis Biodiversity CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Geology and PaleontologyComenius UniversityBratislavaSlovakia
  3. 3.Geological Engineering DepartmentMiddle East Technical UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  4. 4.Instituut Biologie LeidenUniversiteit LeidenLeidenNetherlands
  5. 5.Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC)MadridSpain

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