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Rhinocerotidae from the early middle Miocene locality Gračanica (Bugojno Basin, Bosnia-Herzegovina)

  • Damien BeckerEmail author
  • Jérémy Tissier
Original Paper

Abstract

The early middle Miocene (European Land Mammal Zone MN5) locality Gračanica (Bugojno Basin, Bosnia-Herzegovina) has yielded numerous well-preserved dental remains of four Rhinocerotidae species: Brachypotherium brachypus, Lartetotherium sansaniense, Plesiaceratherium balkanicum sp. nov. and Hispanotherium cf. matritense. This rhinocerotid assemblage is typical of the Orleanian European Land Mammal Age and indicates a mesic woodland with diverse habitats from swampy forest to drier and more open environment.

Keywords

Brachypotherium Lartetotherium Plesiaceratherium balkanicum sp. nov. Hispanotherium Early middle Miocene Southeastern Europe Bosnia-Herzegovina 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This article is a chapter of a special volume dedicated to the early middle Miocene locality Gračanica (Bugojno Basin, Bosnia-Herzegovina). We are grateful to the editors, Ursula Göhlich and Oleg Mandic, for their invitation to contribute to this special issue and their useful comments of the previous version of the article. We warmly acknowledge Christophe Borrely (Muséum d’histoire naturelle Marseille) for having provided access to the collections under their care. Davit Vasilyan is gratefully acknowledged for his helpful informations and discussions about the geological context of the Gračanica locality. We sincerely thank Pierre-Olivier Antoine and an anonymous reviewer for their valuable, detailed and constructive reviews of the original manuscript.

Funding information

This project was financially supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (project 200021_162359).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jurassica MuseumPorrentruySwitzerland
  2. 2.Earth SciencesUniversity of FribourgFribourgSwitzerland

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